Theme 2: Forage--Oral Sessions

Description

Species resiliency to climate change is critical for sustainability of grassland agricultural systems. Transition zones between temperate and tropical climates (between 27 and 31° N and S latitude) with variable annual frost/freeze events have proven to be ideal zones for identification of species with variable climate adaptation. This paper will identify these regions around the globe and show how these regions offer distinct advantages in terms of selection for abiotic and biotic stresses, and thus resiliency to changing climate. Programs located in these regions have the advantage of exposure to alternating extreme warm and cold temperatures, drought and flood conditions, and a multitude of biotic stresses. Examples are presented of successes and constraints in moving cool season species into warmer climates, and tropical species into cooler climates. We present rationale for which direction of species movement (tropical to temperate vs. temperate to tropical) may be more likely to encounter success and why. Specific plant attributes that contribute to climate resiliency will be identified and described. The ability to identify small changes in genetic photoperiod responses in these regions, where daily changes are less than 1.5 m, are illustrated as a further advantage when the objective is development of earlier or later maturity. These regions also provide suitable environments for pests, from both tropical and temperate areas, including diseases, nematodes, and insects, providing desirable field environments for screening and genetic improvement through cycles of recurrent selection. A discussion of reproduction method is included to illustrate the need to accomplish seed production of these species in other zones in order to produce higher yields of high-quality seed.

Share

COinS
 

Temperate/Tropical Transition Zones: A Hotspot for Breeding Forages with Climate Resiliency

Species resiliency to climate change is critical for sustainability of grassland agricultural systems. Transition zones between temperate and tropical climates (between 27 and 31° N and S latitude) with variable annual frost/freeze events have proven to be ideal zones for identification of species with variable climate adaptation. This paper will identify these regions around the globe and show how these regions offer distinct advantages in terms of selection for abiotic and biotic stresses, and thus resiliency to changing climate. Programs located in these regions have the advantage of exposure to alternating extreme warm and cold temperatures, drought and flood conditions, and a multitude of biotic stresses. Examples are presented of successes and constraints in moving cool season species into warmer climates, and tropical species into cooler climates. We present rationale for which direction of species movement (tropical to temperate vs. temperate to tropical) may be more likely to encounter success and why. Specific plant attributes that contribute to climate resiliency will be identified and described. The ability to identify small changes in genetic photoperiod responses in these regions, where daily changes are less than 1.5 m, are illustrated as a further advantage when the objective is development of earlier or later maturity. These regions also provide suitable environments for pests, from both tropical and temperate areas, including diseases, nematodes, and insects, providing desirable field environments for screening and genetic improvement through cycles of recurrent selection. A discussion of reproduction method is included to illustrate the need to accomplish seed production of these species in other zones in order to produce higher yields of high-quality seed.