Theme 2: Forage--Oral Sessions

Description

Improving the use efficiency of dietary protein in ruminants is a major challenge to decrease feed supplementation and significantly decrease nitrogen (N) losses to the environment. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of tannins on protein digestion in the rumen and in conditions simulating the abomasum, using a dynamic in vitro digestive system coupled to a digestomic approach. Three ruminally-cannulated sheep fed with alfalfa hay were infused daily with a solution of tannins, while three other sheep were infused with water (control). Standardized ruminal fluid was introduced into the digester, which simulated the transit of digesta under physicochemical conditions mimicking the abomasum in terms of pH regulation, digestive enzyme infusions and transit rate. Protein degradation in the rumen and in the simulated abomasum was analyzed by determination of fermentation end-products, and identification and quantification of peptides (Label Free Quantification) by LC-MS/MS high resolution (Orbitrap). The analysis of rumen samples showed that tannins result in a clear decrease of fermentation end-products related to protein degradation, namely ammonia (NH3) and iso-volatile fatty acids (VFA), and a greater abundance of the Rubisco, a major plant protein. In the simulated abomasal compartment, the peptidomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis intensity of Rubisco was higher in the presence of tannins compared to the control group. These results indicate that protein-tannin complexes could be dissociated in the physico-chemical conditions of the abomasum, increasing the flow of peptides to the intestine after protection of protein by tannins in the rumen.

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Understanding the Effects of a Tannin Extract on Forage Protein Digestion in the Rumen and Abomasum Using a Dynamic Artificial Digestive System Coupled to a Digestomic Approach

Improving the use efficiency of dietary protein in ruminants is a major challenge to decrease feed supplementation and significantly decrease nitrogen (N) losses to the environment. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of tannins on protein digestion in the rumen and in conditions simulating the abomasum, using a dynamic in vitro digestive system coupled to a digestomic approach. Three ruminally-cannulated sheep fed with alfalfa hay were infused daily with a solution of tannins, while three other sheep were infused with water (control). Standardized ruminal fluid was introduced into the digester, which simulated the transit of digesta under physicochemical conditions mimicking the abomasum in terms of pH regulation, digestive enzyme infusions and transit rate. Protein degradation in the rumen and in the simulated abomasum was analyzed by determination of fermentation end-products, and identification and quantification of peptides (Label Free Quantification) by LC-MS/MS high resolution (Orbitrap). The analysis of rumen samples showed that tannins result in a clear decrease of fermentation end-products related to protein degradation, namely ammonia (NH3) and iso-volatile fatty acids (VFA), and a greater abundance of the Rubisco, a major plant protein. In the simulated abomasal compartment, the peptidomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis intensity of Rubisco was higher in the presence of tannins compared to the control group. These results indicate that protein-tannin complexes could be dissociated in the physico-chemical conditions of the abomasum, increasing the flow of peptides to the intestine after protection of protein by tannins in the rumen.