Abstract

African-American women may be susceptible to stressful events and adverse health outcomes as a result of their distinct social location at the intersection of gender and race. Here, racism and sexism are examined concurrently using survey data from 204 African-American women residing in a southeastern U.S. urban city. Associations among racism, sexism, and stressful events across social roles and contexts (i.e., social network loss, motherhood and childbirth, employment and finances, personal illness and injury, and victimization) are investigated. Then, the relationships among these stressors on psychological distress are compared, and a moderation model is explored. Findings suggest that racism and sexism are a significant source of stress in the lives of African-American women and are correlated with one another and with other stressful events. Implications for future research and clinical considerations are discussed. (APA PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2014

Notes/Citation Information

Published in Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, v. 20, no. 4, p. 561–569.

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The document available for download is the authors' post-peer-review final draft of the article.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1037/a0036700

Funding Information

This research was funded by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01-DA022967, PI Oser & K08- DA032296, PI Stevens-Watkins).

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