Theme 7: Capacity--Oral Sessions

Description

Cattle ranching was introduced to Baja California, Mexico (semiarid and arid climates) by the Spaniards, who brought the animals and the techniques. One important activity was moving livestock from the mountains (forests and few kinds of grass) to the coast crossing poor shrublands known as chaparrals. Fire was a common practice to promote grass growth and pastoralists could move through the land freely. Pastoralism became a common practice when English workers built the Ensenada port and became ranching landowners. They followed the practice of livestock movement through the exorreic watersheds. Native Indians, as well as other Mexicans known as ejidatarios, who had access to communal land, and wealthy livestock managers learned the same transhumance practices. They followed them until recently when privatizing the land began fragmenting the rangeland by installing fences; besides insecure places emerged due to illegal crop production. The Guadalupe watershed in Baja California is an interesting place to study rangelands as dynamic socio-ecological systems driven by institutional changes. Its land-use history has provoked interesting questions oriented to enlighten the future of livestock and rangeland management. This talk deals with the project of a citizen's observatory where results from good local land and water management practices are being compiled and presented in a portal for its out-reach. The internet site will also make available scientific papers translated into infographics to make high-quality information accessible. "Before and after" special techniques like keyline design, holistic management, and other locally adapted techniques are being measured by ranchers and students as a citizen science program. We think that co-monitoring and improving data availability will facilitate local decision-making and deal with the multifunctionality of future rangelands in a better way.

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Participatory Observatories to Connect Multifunctional Landscapes, Link Smallholder Farmers, and Collectively Diversify Income

Cattle ranching was introduced to Baja California, Mexico (semiarid and arid climates) by the Spaniards, who brought the animals and the techniques. One important activity was moving livestock from the mountains (forests and few kinds of grass) to the coast crossing poor shrublands known as chaparrals. Fire was a common practice to promote grass growth and pastoralists could move through the land freely. Pastoralism became a common practice when English workers built the Ensenada port and became ranching landowners. They followed the practice of livestock movement through the exorreic watersheds. Native Indians, as well as other Mexicans known as ejidatarios, who had access to communal land, and wealthy livestock managers learned the same transhumance practices. They followed them until recently when privatizing the land began fragmenting the rangeland by installing fences; besides insecure places emerged due to illegal crop production. The Guadalupe watershed in Baja California is an interesting place to study rangelands as dynamic socio-ecological systems driven by institutional changes. Its land-use history has provoked interesting questions oriented to enlighten the future of livestock and rangeland management. This talk deals with the project of a citizen's observatory where results from good local land and water management practices are being compiled and presented in a portal for its out-reach. The internet site will also make available scientific papers translated into infographics to make high-quality information accessible. "Before and after" special techniques like keyline design, holistic management, and other locally adapted techniques are being measured by ranchers and students as a citizen science program. We think that co-monitoring and improving data availability will facilitate local decision-making and deal with the multifunctionality of future rangelands in a better way.