Theme 6: Pastoralism--Oral Sessions

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Globally, the gender dynamics of rangeland social-ecological systems have received scant attention. Further, research paradigms, methods and methodologies that leave little room for equitable engagement with research participants and genuine action-oriented research-practice partnerships dominate in pastoralist/rangeland studies. Our research is informed by a feminist philosophy of science and based on decolonial and feminist political ecology studies that focus on gendered science and knowledge production. Feminist research calls for reflection on who produces knowledge and how such knowledge is used and shared. Feminist practices such as reciprocity, care, and positionality, cultivate awareness of the power dynamics embedded in the research process and motivate us as researchers to counteract asymmetrical or extractive relationships when we identify them. In this paper we first introduce the principles of our feminist research, and then reflect on our experience as researchers and as activists or participants in the Spanish and Catalan networks of women shepherdesses and livestock operators.

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Knowledge about and Knowledge with: Contributions from Feminist Research to Knowledge Co-Production for Pastoral Systems

Globally, the gender dynamics of rangeland social-ecological systems have received scant attention. Further, research paradigms, methods and methodologies that leave little room for equitable engagement with research participants and genuine action-oriented research-practice partnerships dominate in pastoralist/rangeland studies. Our research is informed by a feminist philosophy of science and based on decolonial and feminist political ecology studies that focus on gendered science and knowledge production. Feminist research calls for reflection on who produces knowledge and how such knowledge is used and shared. Feminist practices such as reciprocity, care, and positionality, cultivate awareness of the power dynamics embedded in the research process and motivate us as researchers to counteract asymmetrical or extractive relationships when we identify them. In this paper we first introduce the principles of our feminist research, and then reflect on our experience as researchers and as activists or participants in the Spanish and Catalan networks of women shepherdesses and livestock operators.