Theme 3: Livestock Production Systems--Oral Sessions

Description

Pastoralism is the main economic activity in the massive drylands of Kenya, consisting over 70% of the countries’ livestock population. It employs 90% of communities living the arid and semi-arid parts of the country. Although few small-scale livestock markets exist in rural pastoral areas, most of the animals end up in the urban markets with peak demand of livestock-based commodities. Dagoretti livestock market, located in Nairobi City (the capital of Kenya) is the largest and terminal market for pastoralist communities countrywide as well as a source of income to various market actors and government revenue. Despite this immense contribution, there is limited scientific information on the market actors, opportunities and challenges encountered at the market, to guide planning, decisions and interventions for sustainable livestock trade in the city of Nairobi. This study was the aim of this study. Data was collected using semi-structured Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) and Focus Group Discussions (KIIs). A total of 41 KIIs and 4 FGDs were conducted with various market actors. Results show that Dagoretti livestock market is dominated by pastoralists, suppliers of animals for trade; whereby cattle consisted 63.5% of total animals sold, sheep (28.7%) and goats (7.8%). Majority of the animals came from Southern and Northern rangelands of Kenya, 43.02% and 21.68% respectively, with only 9.33% from Uganda and Tanzania. The market attracted a myriad of income opportunities including traders in live animals, brokers, transporters, trekkers, loaders and off-loaders, herders of unsold animals, forage-sellers, veterinary officers, revenue officers, food vendors, cleaners, security guards, branders, butchers, and slaughtered animal value-chains. Main challenges included high taxation barriers, poor infrastructure, lack of incentives, and animal-congestion. There is need for regulatory frameworks supporting livestock trade and incentives to empower market actors, improve efficiency in market operations, and returns to the government and individual actors.

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Analysis of Actors and Activities at Dagoretti Livestock Market in Nairobi City, Kenya

Pastoralism is the main economic activity in the massive drylands of Kenya, consisting over 70% of the countries’ livestock population. It employs 90% of communities living the arid and semi-arid parts of the country. Although few small-scale livestock markets exist in rural pastoral areas, most of the animals end up in the urban markets with peak demand of livestock-based commodities. Dagoretti livestock market, located in Nairobi City (the capital of Kenya) is the largest and terminal market for pastoralist communities countrywide as well as a source of income to various market actors and government revenue. Despite this immense contribution, there is limited scientific information on the market actors, opportunities and challenges encountered at the market, to guide planning, decisions and interventions for sustainable livestock trade in the city of Nairobi. This study was the aim of this study. Data was collected using semi-structured Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) and Focus Group Discussions (KIIs). A total of 41 KIIs and 4 FGDs were conducted with various market actors. Results show that Dagoretti livestock market is dominated by pastoralists, suppliers of animals for trade; whereby cattle consisted 63.5% of total animals sold, sheep (28.7%) and goats (7.8%). Majority of the animals came from Southern and Northern rangelands of Kenya, 43.02% and 21.68% respectively, with only 9.33% from Uganda and Tanzania. The market attracted a myriad of income opportunities including traders in live animals, brokers, transporters, trekkers, loaders and off-loaders, herders of unsold animals, forage-sellers, veterinary officers, revenue officers, food vendors, cleaners, security guards, branders, butchers, and slaughtered animal value-chains. Main challenges included high taxation barriers, poor infrastructure, lack of incentives, and animal-congestion. There is need for regulatory frameworks supporting livestock trade and incentives to empower market actors, improve efficiency in market operations, and returns to the government and individual actors.