Theme 3: Livestock--Oral Sessions

Description

This study evaluates the food security status, its determinants and the coping strategies in crop, livestock and mixed crop-livestock systems in southern Mali. Interviews were conducted with 258 households that were categorized into the three farming systems based on the revenue from livestock and crop production. A linear mixed model was used to analyse the effects of household characteristics on food security using the food consumption score (FCS), household dietary diversity score (HDDS), a modified household food insecurity access scale (mHFIAS) and coping strategies as indicators. Food consumption score was significantly influenced by the farming system with highest FCS for the livestock system (88) followed by the mixed system (77) and the crop system (69). Moreover, FCS was positively influenced by the number of crops cultivated, total farm milk production, off-farm income and number of raised chickens (p < 0.1). The main difference in food intake between systems was for milk with average daily consumption of 201 ml, 110 ml and 60 ml in the livestock, mixed and crop systems, respectively. HDDS was also significantly influenced by the farming system with highest HDDS values for the livestock system (8.9), followed by the mixed system (8.2) and the crop system (8.0). Further, HDDS was positively influenced by crop diversity and number of chickens, and negatively influenced by the number of family dependents. During the food shortage period of August, households from the crop system were more food insecure than households from the mixed and livestock systems with mHFIAS values of 0.9, 1.5 and 4.3, respectively. Livestock and mixed systems were more resilient to food insecurity situations than the crop system. This study confirms the direct effect of milk production on milk consumption and the importance of livestock for enhancing food security and livelihood resilience.

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Food Security in Crop, Livestock and Mixed Farming Systems in Mali

This study evaluates the food security status, its determinants and the coping strategies in crop, livestock and mixed crop-livestock systems in southern Mali. Interviews were conducted with 258 households that were categorized into the three farming systems based on the revenue from livestock and crop production. A linear mixed model was used to analyse the effects of household characteristics on food security using the food consumption score (FCS), household dietary diversity score (HDDS), a modified household food insecurity access scale (mHFIAS) and coping strategies as indicators. Food consumption score was significantly influenced by the farming system with highest FCS for the livestock system (88) followed by the mixed system (77) and the crop system (69). Moreover, FCS was positively influenced by the number of crops cultivated, total farm milk production, off-farm income and number of raised chickens (p < 0.1). The main difference in food intake between systems was for milk with average daily consumption of 201 ml, 110 ml and 60 ml in the livestock, mixed and crop systems, respectively. HDDS was also significantly influenced by the farming system with highest HDDS values for the livestock system (8.9), followed by the mixed system (8.2) and the crop system (8.0). Further, HDDS was positively influenced by crop diversity and number of chickens, and negatively influenced by the number of family dependents. During the food shortage period of August, households from the crop system were more food insecure than households from the mixed and livestock systems with mHFIAS values of 0.9, 1.5 and 4.3, respectively. Livestock and mixed systems were more resilient to food insecurity situations than the crop system. This study confirms the direct effect of milk production on milk consumption and the importance of livestock for enhancing food security and livelihood resilience.