Theme 1: Rangeland/Grassland Ecology--Oral Sessions

Description

Māori (the indigenous people of New Zealand) have many opportunities and challenges to realise the potential provided by their whenua (land), wai (water) and tangata (people) to deliver to their goals and aspirations. The challenges are old and new, including environmental constraints, governance, geographic isolation, fragmented land ownership, access to finance, and lack of appropriate skills, knowledge, and networks. Extension programmes aimed at the general primary production sector have failed to attract or retain any or many Māori participants. Landowner to landowner learning built around landowner aspirations along with collective action has the potential to inform an extension approach of relevance to Māori. Shared knowledge and scale can enable the realisation of opportunities from networked primary production assets and people. A programme of work “Māori Agribusiness Extension (MABX)” is being undertaken where clusters, a grouping of Māori-owned land blocks or agribusinesses willing to collaborate or collectivise towards a common goal or agreed outcomes, are formed to enable collective learning to build confidence to implement land use change and support decision making. This paper describes the extension model being used and gives an example of one cluster.

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Identifying Land Use Options for Networked Māori Owned Land Blocks to Deliver on Collective Aspirations in New Zealand

Māori (the indigenous people of New Zealand) have many opportunities and challenges to realise the potential provided by their whenua (land), wai (water) and tangata (people) to deliver to their goals and aspirations. The challenges are old and new, including environmental constraints, governance, geographic isolation, fragmented land ownership, access to finance, and lack of appropriate skills, knowledge, and networks. Extension programmes aimed at the general primary production sector have failed to attract or retain any or many Māori participants. Landowner to landowner learning built around landowner aspirations along with collective action has the potential to inform an extension approach of relevance to Māori. Shared knowledge and scale can enable the realisation of opportunities from networked primary production assets and people. A programme of work “Māori Agribusiness Extension (MABX)” is being undertaken where clusters, a grouping of Māori-owned land blocks or agribusinesses willing to collaborate or collectivise towards a common goal or agreed outcomes, are formed to enable collective learning to build confidence to implement land use change and support decision making. This paper describes the extension model being used and gives an example of one cluster.