Start Date

13-1-2006 1:00 PM

Description

Cattlemen typically simplify their pasture management by relying on one or two forages that are well adapted and persist under their targeted levels of management and production. The 5.5 million acres of Kentucky-31 tall fescue in Kentucky is a strong indication how producers in the state rely on the cool-season perennial grass, sometimes in mixture with red or white clover, to meet their grazing needs. An advantage of this approach is that fertilization and grazing management is based on a single growth distribution and set of fertilizer needs. Disadvantages are that yield, growth distribution, and quality of forage may not meet targeted levels of cattle production, and that hay and costly concentrate supplements will be needed during lengthy periods of dormancy and inactive growth. Furthermore, dependence on endophyte-infected tall fescue as the sole pasture forage greatly increases vulnerabilities to fescue toxicosis, fescue foot, and fat necrosis, maladies caused by ergot alkaloids contained in endophyte-infected tall fescue.

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Jan 13th, 1:00 PM

Forage Systems for Minimizing Hay and Concentrate Feed Needs

Cattlemen typically simplify their pasture management by relying on one or two forages that are well adapted and persist under their targeted levels of management and production. The 5.5 million acres of Kentucky-31 tall fescue in Kentucky is a strong indication how producers in the state rely on the cool-season perennial grass, sometimes in mixture with red or white clover, to meet their grazing needs. An advantage of this approach is that fertilization and grazing management is based on a single growth distribution and set of fertilizer needs. Disadvantages are that yield, growth distribution, and quality of forage may not meet targeted levels of cattle production, and that hay and costly concentrate supplements will be needed during lengthy periods of dormancy and inactive growth. Furthermore, dependence on endophyte-infected tall fescue as the sole pasture forage greatly increases vulnerabilities to fescue toxicosis, fescue foot, and fat necrosis, maladies caused by ergot alkaloids contained in endophyte-infected tall fescue.