Keynote Lectures

Description

Seed quality is defined as (i) maintaining genetic purity using seed certification principles (generation system; isolation; previous cropping history); (ii) achieving high levels of physical purity (especially low weed seed levels) by in field weed control and seed cleaning; (iii) achieving high levels of seed germination at harvest and maintaining germination through the seed supply chain. Seed production systems must not only produce high quality seed but also achieve economic seed yields. Seed crops have to be profitable (by being high yielding) to justify the investment of time and input costs to achieve quality. This in turn requires supporting research and extension to seed growers.

Effective marketing requires a seed supply chain from the forage user back to seed producer i.e. it should be demand driven. Creating demand requires on farm trials and demonstrations to develop awareness and to move end-users away from commodity price-sensitive thinking. End users must understand the need for, and value of, paying a premium price for quality seed and for new cultivars that can add value to crops and livestock. Four seed supply chain models are discussed.

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Quality Seed Production and Effective Marketing Systems for Development of Grasslands

Seed quality is defined as (i) maintaining genetic purity using seed certification principles (generation system; isolation; previous cropping history); (ii) achieving high levels of physical purity (especially low weed seed levels) by in field weed control and seed cleaning; (iii) achieving high levels of seed germination at harvest and maintaining germination through the seed supply chain. Seed production systems must not only produce high quality seed but also achieve economic seed yields. Seed crops have to be profitable (by being high yielding) to justify the investment of time and input costs to achieve quality. This in turn requires supporting research and extension to seed growers.

Effective marketing requires a seed supply chain from the forage user back to seed producer i.e. it should be demand driven. Creating demand requires on farm trials and demonstrations to develop awareness and to move end-users away from commodity price-sensitive thinking. End users must understand the need for, and value of, paying a premium price for quality seed and for new cultivars that can add value to crops and livestock. Four seed supply chain models are discussed.