Track 1-04

Description

There is uncertainty about future climatic predictions; however there is little doubt amongst experts that the future will be warmer. Climate change and the associated elevation in atmospheric CO2 level and temperatures will provide novel challenges and potential opportunities for cultivated plant species. Plant breeding and domestication can contributed to improvements in both yield and quality of grasses and fodder shrubs. A range of key functional traits is required to cope with this changing climate. The main challenges that are discussed are new pests and pathogens; changes in the pattern of nutrient supply and forage quality; challenge associated with a shorter growing season; drought tolerance and persistence. With the domestication of any species, consideration needs to be given in terms of duty of care (weediness, anti-nutritional/toxic to animals, regulations) and the on farm adoption of new selections. Two case studies have been included in the paper, one on native grasses and the other on native shrub, old man saltbush.

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The Use of Functional Traits to Identify Grasses and Fodder Shrubs for Domestication to Suit a Changing Climate

There is uncertainty about future climatic predictions; however there is little doubt amongst experts that the future will be warmer. Climate change and the associated elevation in atmospheric CO2 level and temperatures will provide novel challenges and potential opportunities for cultivated plant species. Plant breeding and domestication can contributed to improvements in both yield and quality of grasses and fodder shrubs. A range of key functional traits is required to cope with this changing climate. The main challenges that are discussed are new pests and pathogens; changes in the pattern of nutrient supply and forage quality; challenge associated with a shorter growing season; drought tolerance and persistence. With the domestication of any species, consideration needs to be given in terms of duty of care (weediness, anti-nutritional/toxic to animals, regulations) and the on farm adoption of new selections. Two case studies have been included in the paper, one on native grasses and the other on native shrub, old man saltbush.