Track 1-03

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In integrated systems it is common to use the no-tillage method. The adoption of this method improves the system's sustainability (Laurent et al. 2011). It is necessary to understand the effects of the integrated systems on sward structure and its consequences in the grazing process and in animal production. The intake rate of grazing animals is primarily responsible for the animal performance (Coleman 2006), which short-termdepends mainly on sward structure (Laca and Demment 2006). The sward height has great influence on the animal decision on where to take the next bite (Mcgilloway et al. 1999). The hypothesis of this work was: is there an optimum sward height for ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) to maximize the intake rate by grazing animals and does this height vary depending on the existence of the base layer of straw canopy?

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Methods of Ryegrass Establishment (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) Affecting Optimal Sward Height to Maximize the Intake Rate

In integrated systems it is common to use the no-tillage method. The adoption of this method improves the system's sustainability (Laurent et al. 2011). It is necessary to understand the effects of the integrated systems on sward structure and its consequences in the grazing process and in animal production. The intake rate of grazing animals is primarily responsible for the animal performance (Coleman 2006), which short-termdepends mainly on sward structure (Laca and Demment 2006). The sward height has great influence on the animal decision on where to take the next bite (Mcgilloway et al. 1999). The hypothesis of this work was: is there an optimum sward height for ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) to maximize the intake rate by grazing animals and does this height vary depending on the existence of the base layer of straw canopy?