Track 1-10

Description

It is imperative to find alternative source(s) of feed for livestock in lieu of the limited availability of conventional concentrates and the competition for this resource by man. One plant with great potential for the livestock is bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina). It is wide spread with about 200 species, is edible, drought tolerant, nutritious and has been found to have medicinal qualities (John 1994). V. amygdalina has an astringent taste which affects its intake. Bitter leaf meal contains 20-34% crude protein (CP) and can be used as protein supplement (Aregheore et al. 1998). With the recent introduction of trees and shrubs into cropping and grazing systems to provide high protein fodder to supplement post harvest crop residues, it is conceivable that V. amygdalina could play a valuable role in ruminant feeding system.

This study was conducted to assess the dry matter, protein and fibre digestibility by WAD sheep fed diets containing various levels of Vernonia amygdalina leaf meal.

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Dry Matter, Protein and Fibre Digestibility by West African Dwarf Sheep Fed Varying Levels of Vernonia amygdalina Meal in Cassava Starch Residue-Based Diets

It is imperative to find alternative source(s) of feed for livestock in lieu of the limited availability of conventional concentrates and the competition for this resource by man. One plant with great potential for the livestock is bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina). It is wide spread with about 200 species, is edible, drought tolerant, nutritious and has been found to have medicinal qualities (John 1994). V. amygdalina has an astringent taste which affects its intake. Bitter leaf meal contains 20-34% crude protein (CP) and can be used as protein supplement (Aregheore et al. 1998). With the recent introduction of trees and shrubs into cropping and grazing systems to provide high protein fodder to supplement post harvest crop residues, it is conceivable that V. amygdalina could play a valuable role in ruminant feeding system.

This study was conducted to assess the dry matter, protein and fibre digestibility by WAD sheep fed diets containing various levels of Vernonia amygdalina leaf meal.