Year of Publication

2017

Degree Name

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Committee Chair

Dr. Dianna Inman

Clinical Mentor

Dr. Klaus Boel

Committee Member

Dr. Leslie Scott

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the results of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire to the Survey of Well-Being of Young Children to determine if they produced the same outcomes. The Survey of Well-Being of Young Children offers additional screening tools that address risk factors for child abuse, that the Ages and Stages does not include. This project also surveyed the caregivers completing the questionnaires to determine which questionnaire they found more beneficial.

Background and Significance: In the United States, approximately 15% of children ages 3 to 17 years of age have at least one developmental disability. When the disabilities are identified early, and interventions are implemented, problems associated with the disability can be decreased. In recent years, the number of children that suffer from child abuse has increased tremendously. In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 681,000 children were the victims of child abuse or neglect. When risk factors associated with an increase in child abuse are identified, the risk of child abuse decreases.

Procedures: This study examined the results of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire and the Survey of Well-Being of Young Children that were completed by 30 caregivers in a pediatric primary care practice.

Results: There was no significant difference between the Ages and Stages Questionnaire and the Survey of Well-Being of Young Children (p>0.9). The majority of the caregivers completing the questionnaires preferred the Survey of Well-Being of Young Children (83.3%) compared to the Ages and Stages (16.7%).

Conclusion: By using the Survey of Well-Being of Young Children, not only will developmental delays be properly identified, but also risk factors that are associated with an increased risk of child abuse or neglect.

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