Author ORCID Identifier

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5526-4586

Year of Publication

2017

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Document Type

Master's Thesis

College

Agriculture, Food and Environment

Department

Animal and Food Sciences

First Advisor

Dr. Melissa Newman

Abstract

The research within this thesis sought to determine the ability of various animal derived fats and plant derived oils to support the survival of several pathogenic cocktails over a multitude of storage times. The Salmonella study explored the survival rate of a four strain Salmonella cocktail in beef tallow, pig lard, duck fat, coconut oil, and extra virgin olive oil over seven days at 26˚C and 37˚C storage. The animal fats and the coconut oil supported the survival of the bacteria until the conclusion of the study. The Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli study explored the survival rate of a five strain STECs cocktail in extra virgin olive oil over seven days at 26˚C and 37˚C storage. The two Listeria studies explored the survival rate of a four strain Listeria monocytogenes cocktail in extra virgin olive oil over several time periods with different frequencies of sample mixing. In vitro, all genuses showed a 2.5-log cfu/mL to ≥ 7-log cfu/mL reduction in the extra virgin olive oil by the conclusion of the experiments. Extra virgin olive oil was then applied to cooked pork tenderloin, cheddar cheese snack squares, and turkey lunchmeat in hopes of inhibiting the L. monocytogenes cocktail. No reduction was observed.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2017.121

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