Start Date

24-2-1994 4:00 PM

Description

Hay is one of the most versatile of stored forages in that (1) it can be kept for long periods of time with little loss of nutrients if protected from weather; (2) a large number of crops can be successfully used for hay production; (3) it can be produced and fed in small or large amounts; (4) it can be harvested, stored and fed by hand or the production and feeding can be completely mechanized; and (5) hay can supply most nutrients needed by many classes of livestock. Hay is, therefore, the most commonly used stored feed on most farms.

Alfalfa hay is an important part of Kentucky's forage/livestock system. Alfalfa as a crop is the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume in Kentucky. It is highly versatile in that it can be used in many forms including hay, haylage, and pasture by nearly all types of livestock. Kentucky raises over 300 thousand acres of alfalfa annually and has the potential for up to 2 million acres. Alfalfa hay is the base of the Kentucky cash hay market and is a significant part of the rations of lactating dairy cows, horses, and growing beef animals.

Since alfalfa hay is such a widely used feed, it is important to understand the factors that affect quality of hay.

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COinS
 
Feb 24th, 4:00 PM

Producing Quality Alfalfa Hay

Hay is one of the most versatile of stored forages in that (1) it can be kept for long periods of time with little loss of nutrients if protected from weather; (2) a large number of crops can be successfully used for hay production; (3) it can be produced and fed in small or large amounts; (4) it can be harvested, stored and fed by hand or the production and feeding can be completely mechanized; and (5) hay can supply most nutrients needed by many classes of livestock. Hay is, therefore, the most commonly used stored feed on most farms.

Alfalfa hay is an important part of Kentucky's forage/livestock system. Alfalfa as a crop is the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume in Kentucky. It is highly versatile in that it can be used in many forms including hay, haylage, and pasture by nearly all types of livestock. Kentucky raises over 300 thousand acres of alfalfa annually and has the potential for up to 2 million acres. Alfalfa hay is the base of the Kentucky cash hay market and is a significant part of the rations of lactating dairy cows, horses, and growing beef animals.

Since alfalfa hay is such a widely used feed, it is important to understand the factors that affect quality of hay.