Year of Publication

2017

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Document Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Peggy S. Keller

Abstract

The abuse of prescription stimulants among college students is a growing public health concern. While these substances are often viewed as safe, “smart drugs”, they are associated with a number of maladaptive outcomes, ranging from poorer academic performance to cardiovascular incidents and even death. To date, the majority of research on the abuse of these substances have focused on demographic factors which are not amenable to intervention, such as race, Greek organization status, and class rank. The current study examined family factors, academic stress, and impulsivity as potential risk factors which are amenable to intervention. In a sample of 335 undergraduate students, no associations were found between family variables and prescription stimulant abuse or academic stress and prescription stimulant abuse. Inconsistent support was found for an association between impulsivity and prescription stimulant abuse.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2017.422

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