Year of Publication

2015

Degree Name

Master of Science in Education (MSEd)

Document Type

Master's Thesis

College

Education

Department/School/Program

Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Kenneth Tyler

Abstract

Students generally spend more than ten years interacting with teachers in a classroom and thus, such interactions can have a positive or negative impact on students’ academic self-concept and educational goals (Rosenthal, Folse, Allerman, Boudreaux, Soper, & Von Bergen, 2000). The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a significant relationship between student-teacher interactions and academic self-concept. Participants in the study include African American male high school students in an urban school district. The independent variable is the student-teacher interactions, as measured by the Student-Professor Interaction Scale (Cokley et al., 2004). The dependent variable is the students’ academic-self-concept, which is measured by the Academic Self-Concept Scale (Reynolds, Ramirez, Magrina, & Allen, 1980). The data was analyzed by using Pearson’s correlation and hierarchical multiple regression to determine if there was a statistically significant relationship between the two variables. Findings, study limitations, and future research directions are also discussed.

Share

COinS