Year of Publication

2013

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Document Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

Education

Department/School/Program

Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Kenneth Tyler

Second Advisor

Dr. Ellen Usher

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and reading achievement and to examine the predictive validity of a variety of reading self-efficacy measures in a sample of 364 students in Grades 4 to 6. Mean differences in self-efficacy were also examined by gender, ethnicity, and school type. Results suggested that the four measures of reading self-efficacy were psychometrically sound. Mean differences were not present for students based on gender or ethnicity. Elementary school students reported higher levels of reading test self-efficacy than did middle school students. Reading self-efficacy predicted reading performance as measured by four different outcomes (i.e., language arts grades, scores on a standardized reading test, teacher ratings of students’ reading competence, and daily minutes read). For these analyses, the type of reading self-efficacy that most closely corresponded with the performance outcome was the best predictor. These findings suggest that reading self-efficacy is best measured in a context-specific manner.

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