Year of Publication

2016

College

Public Health

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Committee Chair

Steven Browning, PhD, MSPH

Committee Member

Lorie Chesnut, DrPH, MPH

Committee Member

Glyn Caldwell, MD

Abstract

Objective: The main objective of this study was to analyze risk factors associated with severe occupational injuries among inland aquaculture farms.

Methods: Survey results were compiled in a data set that consisted of qualitative data from 51 farmers who were interviewed between 2008 and 2011 in 10 states and the Canadian province of British Columbia. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test were used to assess the differences in the dichotomous level of severity among several farm and injury variables. Logistic regression was used to predict the outcome of a severe injury event.

Results: Injury observations that indicated the use of raceway systems made up 42.4% of severe injuries compared to 61.5% of injury observations that indicated use of raceway systems in the less severe category. Injury observations that happened on farms that use of pond had higher percentage of severe injuries (63.8%) compared to less severe injuries (51.9%). Injury observations that happened on farms that use raceway systems indicated an adjusted odds ratio of 0.62 [95% CI: 0.26 – 1.48] and observations that happened on farms that use ponds indicated an adjusted odds ratio of 1.33 [95% CI: 0.54 – 3.27].

Conclusion: Farms that use more advanced technology are less likely to have a severe injury event occur. This study suggest that workers may be have a higher odds of a severe injury when working on farms that are less automated and have less technology.

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