Water Management and Construction Impacts.pdf

Christine Harris, Groundwater Treatment and Technology, LLC (GWTT)

Description

Water Management and Construction Impacts Authors Mrs. Christine Harris - United States - Groundwater Treatment and Technology, LLC (GWTT) Abstract When closing an ash impoundment there are many steps in the process. Understanding the relationship between water management and civil construction is important. In most cases, before civil construction can begin, free liquids must be removed from the impoundment. Usually, the water removed must be treated before it can be discharged. The success (or failure) of these two activities can have an impact on the ability of the civil construction contractor to perform the work. The responsibility for dewatering is assigned to the civil contractor. This contractor is responsible for supplying water, within certain constituent parameters to the water treatment plant which may or may not part of the civil contract. The water treatment system is usually designed based on water quality samples provided by the owner with minimum and maximum influent constituent values. While the information is valuable, some of the constituent values can change once civil construction begins. Depending on the changes to the influent values, this can impact the ability of the water treatment system to operate and meet effluent discharge values. This presentation will explore the issues that arise in communications between the dewatering system and water treatment system operators and the potential impact on construction.

 
May 15th, 3:00 PM May 15th, 3:30 PM

Water Management and Construction Impacts.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Water Management and Construction Impacts Authors Mrs. Christine Harris - United States - Groundwater Treatment and Technology, LLC (GWTT) Abstract When closing an ash impoundment there are many steps in the process. Understanding the relationship between water management and civil construction is important. In most cases, before civil construction can begin, free liquids must be removed from the impoundment. Usually, the water removed must be treated before it can be discharged. The success (or failure) of these two activities can have an impact on the ability of the civil construction contractor to perform the work. The responsibility for dewatering is assigned to the civil contractor. This contractor is responsible for supplying water, within certain constituent parameters to the water treatment plant which may or may not part of the civil contract. The water treatment system is usually designed based on water quality samples provided by the owner with minimum and maximum influent constituent values. While the information is valuable, some of the constituent values can change once civil construction begins. Depending on the changes to the influent values, this can impact the ability of the water treatment system to operate and meet effluent discharge values. This presentation will explore the issues that arise in communications between the dewatering system and water treatment system operators and the potential impact on construction.