Uniaxial Compressive Behavior of “Solidified” Synthetic Lightweight Aggregates.pdf

Annika Han, GEI Consultants, Inc.
Chris Swan, Tufts University

Description

Uniaxial Compressive Behavior of “Solidified” Synthetic Lightweight Aggregates Authors Ms. Annika Han - United States - GEI Consultants, Inc. Prof. Chris Swan - United States - Tufts University Abstract This paper presents results from uniaxial compression tests on a synthetic lightweight aggregate (SLA) created from high carbon fly ash and mixed waste plastics. Since their invention in the late 1990’s, SLA has represented an innovative and potentially novel construction material created solely from the co-extrusion of these two, high volume, waste streams. This current effort involved testing specimens created as “solidified” SLA cylinders. Three types of cylindrical specimen were created from ‘loose’ SLA that existed at the following grain-size ranges: Coarse (between U.S. sieve No. 4 and No. 8 or between 2.36 to 4.75mm), Medium (between No. 8 and No. 16 or between 1.18 to 2.36mm), and Fine (between No. 16 to No. 30 or between 0.6 to 1.18mm). Though the initial porosity of loose SLA was between 0.4 to 0.5, compression led to final specimen porosities of 0.05 to 0.3; creating cylinders competent enough to be subjected to uniaxial compression tests (i.e., no lateral support needed during testing). Final cylinders were nominally 10cm high and 3.5cm in diameter. Uniaxial compressive tests were performed for the various types of test specimens created. Additionally, an on-specimen yoke system was used during testing to capture small strain compressive behaviors (e.g., Young’s moduli) of the various “solidified” SLA specimens. Results from the uniaxial compression tests showed the ultimate strength of the cylinders increased as the “solidified” specimen’s compressed porosity decreased. Also, the initial Young’s modulus of the “solidified” specimens increased as the specimen’s compressed porosity decreased. What is of interest is that there was a only a small, if any, difference between the three types of SLA cylinders – Coarse, Medium, and Fine – indicating that the properties measured do represent that of the micro SLA regardless of its initial, loose size range.

 
May 15th, 8:00 AM May 15th, 8:30 AM

Uniaxial Compressive Behavior of “Solidified” Synthetic Lightweight Aggregates.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Uniaxial Compressive Behavior of “Solidified” Synthetic Lightweight Aggregates Authors Ms. Annika Han - United States - GEI Consultants, Inc. Prof. Chris Swan - United States - Tufts University Abstract This paper presents results from uniaxial compression tests on a synthetic lightweight aggregate (SLA) created from high carbon fly ash and mixed waste plastics. Since their invention in the late 1990’s, SLA has represented an innovative and potentially novel construction material created solely from the co-extrusion of these two, high volume, waste streams. This current effort involved testing specimens created as “solidified” SLA cylinders. Three types of cylindrical specimen were created from ‘loose’ SLA that existed at the following grain-size ranges: Coarse (between U.S. sieve No. 4 and No. 8 or between 2.36 to 4.75mm), Medium (between No. 8 and No. 16 or between 1.18 to 2.36mm), and Fine (between No. 16 to No. 30 or between 0.6 to 1.18mm). Though the initial porosity of loose SLA was between 0.4 to 0.5, compression led to final specimen porosities of 0.05 to 0.3; creating cylinders competent enough to be subjected to uniaxial compression tests (i.e., no lateral support needed during testing). Final cylinders were nominally 10cm high and 3.5cm in diameter. Uniaxial compressive tests were performed for the various types of test specimens created. Additionally, an on-specimen yoke system was used during testing to capture small strain compressive behaviors (e.g., Young’s moduli) of the various “solidified” SLA specimens. Results from the uniaxial compression tests showed the ultimate strength of the cylinders increased as the “solidified” specimen’s compressed porosity decreased. Also, the initial Young’s modulus of the “solidified” specimens increased as the specimen’s compressed porosity decreased. What is of interest is that there was a only a small, if any, difference between the three types of SLA cylinders – Coarse, Medium, and Fine – indicating that the properties measured do represent that of the micro SLA regardless of its initial, loose size range.