UNDERSTANDING THE STRATIGRAPHY OF FLUVIAL SYSTEMS AND WHY IT IS ESSENTIAL TO COMPLIANCE.pdf

Colin Plank, Burns & McDonnell
Mike Shultz, Burns & McDonnell
James Feild, Burns & McDonnell
Wayne Weber, Burns & McDonnell

Description

Understanding The Stratigraphy of Fluvial Systems and Why it is Essential to Compliance With The Legacy Rule Revisions to CCR Regulations. Authors Mr. Colin Plank - United States - Burns & McDonnell Dr. Mike Shultz - United States - Burns & McDonnell Dr. James Feild - United States - Burns & McDonnell Mr. Wayne Weber - United States - Burns & McDonnell Abstract The “Legacy Rule” revisions of Combustible Coal Residuals (CCR) regulations for inactive electric utility surface impoundments and CCR management units and the aggressive timelines associated with compliance makes efficient evaluation of potential groundwater impacts critical for program managers. Appropriate networks of groundwater monitoring wells, installed as early as 6 months after the effective date of the legacy rule, are required. Clearly establishing the site’s Hydrogeologic Conceptual Site Model (CSM) is imperative for cost-effectively and efficiently creating a robust monitoring well network. The lithology, hydraulic conductivity, geometry, and connectivity of the hydrostratigraphic units that control groundwater flow-paths depend on the type of sedimentary system that deposited them. Because a majority of CCR sites are located adjacent to rivers, most CSMs require a fundamental understanding of the stratigraphic characteristics and heterogeneity of fluvial deposits and an understanding of alluvial valley fill. Combinations of existing lithologic data, historical maps and imagery, and desk-top study using state and U.S. geologic survey data can be leveraged to establish a geologically defensible CSM using the U.S. EPA’s best-practice of Environmental Sequence Stratigraphy (ESS). We provide examples and outcomes of the application of ESS to optimize monitoring programs at several sites in the Midwest and southeastern U.S.

 
May 15th, 2:30 PM May 15th, 3:00 PM

UNDERSTANDING THE STRATIGRAPHY OF FLUVIAL SYSTEMS AND WHY IT IS ESSENTIAL TO COMPLIANCE.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Understanding The Stratigraphy of Fluvial Systems and Why it is Essential to Compliance With The Legacy Rule Revisions to CCR Regulations. Authors Mr. Colin Plank - United States - Burns & McDonnell Dr. Mike Shultz - United States - Burns & McDonnell Dr. James Feild - United States - Burns & McDonnell Mr. Wayne Weber - United States - Burns & McDonnell Abstract The “Legacy Rule” revisions of Combustible Coal Residuals (CCR) regulations for inactive electric utility surface impoundments and CCR management units and the aggressive timelines associated with compliance makes efficient evaluation of potential groundwater impacts critical for program managers. Appropriate networks of groundwater monitoring wells, installed as early as 6 months after the effective date of the legacy rule, are required. Clearly establishing the site’s Hydrogeologic Conceptual Site Model (CSM) is imperative for cost-effectively and efficiently creating a robust monitoring well network. The lithology, hydraulic conductivity, geometry, and connectivity of the hydrostratigraphic units that control groundwater flow-paths depend on the type of sedimentary system that deposited them. Because a majority of CCR sites are located adjacent to rivers, most CSMs require a fundamental understanding of the stratigraphic characteristics and heterogeneity of fluvial deposits and an understanding of alluvial valley fill. Combinations of existing lithologic data, historical maps and imagery, and desk-top study using state and U.S. geologic survey data can be leveraged to establish a geologically defensible CSM using the U.S. EPA’s best-practice of Environmental Sequence Stratigraphy (ESS). We provide examples and outcomes of the application of ESS to optimize monitoring programs at several sites in the Midwest and southeastern U.S.