Tricky Constituents- Issues with Leachate and Groundwater Constituents of Concern.pdf

William Kennedy, Stantec

Description

Tricky Constituents – Issues with Leachate and Groundwater Constituents of Concern Authors Mr. William Kennedy - United States - Stantec Abstract Certain parameters in wastewater are more problematic to treat than others. Some constituents of concern such as arsenic and mercury are amenable to chemical precipitation, given the correct conditions. Others such as lithium, boron, and molybdenum are much more problematic – both in terms of cost and complexity. For waters from pump and treat systems that produce discharges to surface waters, it is important to correctly identify the appropriate discharge concentrations. Certain groundwater or leachate constituents of concern do not have a corresponding numerical surface water discharge criterion in some jurisdictions. Or the impact from the pump and treat activity can be accommodated in the surface waters’ assimilative capacity. In general, these systems cannot cause harm to the receiving stream, so it becomes critical to know the numeric targets in the discharge that protects water quality. As these systems can be in operation for decades, it is also important to incorporate flexibility as new constituents could be regulated and natural attenuation of certain constituents can occur that could reduce treatment needs.

 
May 15th, 1:00 PM May 15th, 1:30 PM

Tricky Constituents- Issues with Leachate and Groundwater Constituents of Concern.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Tricky Constituents – Issues with Leachate and Groundwater Constituents of Concern Authors Mr. William Kennedy - United States - Stantec Abstract Certain parameters in wastewater are more problematic to treat than others. Some constituents of concern such as arsenic and mercury are amenable to chemical precipitation, given the correct conditions. Others such as lithium, boron, and molybdenum are much more problematic – both in terms of cost and complexity. For waters from pump and treat systems that produce discharges to surface waters, it is important to correctly identify the appropriate discharge concentrations. Certain groundwater or leachate constituents of concern do not have a corresponding numerical surface water discharge criterion in some jurisdictions. Or the impact from the pump and treat activity can be accommodated in the surface waters’ assimilative capacity. In general, these systems cannot cause harm to the receiving stream, so it becomes critical to know the numeric targets in the discharge that protects water quality. As these systems can be in operation for decades, it is also important to incorporate flexibility as new constituents could be regulated and natural attenuation of certain constituents can occur that could reduce treatment needs.