NAVIGATING THE COMPLEXITIES OF CCR GROUNDWATER ASSESSMENT & MONITORING IN COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS-​ A TECHNICAL EXPLORATION.pdf

Stephen Wilson, Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting
Trenton Godwin, Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting
Kevin Stephenson, Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting

Description

Navigating the Complexities of Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) Groundwater Assessment and Monitoring in Coastal Environments: A Technical Exploration Authors Mr. Stephen Wilson - United States - Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting Mr. Trenton Godwin - United States - Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting Mr. Kevin Stephenson - United States - Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting Abstract Coastal environments pose distinctive challenges for the monitoring and assessment of Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) groundwater. Unlike their inland counterparts, coastal sites present complexities such as naturally-occurring brackish or saline groundwater containing elevated concentrations of Appendix III and IV constituents. These constituents, complicating both background assessments and compliance evaluations, are exacerbated by the existence of salt marshes and other brackish surface water bodies. These surface water features can act as alternative sources of Appendix III and IV constituents to groundwater. Additionally, the presence of tidally-influenced groundwater and surface water introduces dynamic factors, rapidly altering potentiometric surfaces, groundwater flow directions, and overall groundwater quality. The geographic location of coastal CCR sites, their limited accessibility, and comparatively smaller size further complicate groundwater assessment and monitoring. In contrast to often expansive inland coal-fired power plant sites spanning thousands of acres, coastal CCR sites typically occupy tens of acres or less. This spatial constraint poses challenges for delineating impacted groundwater before reaching property boundaries, on-site obstacles, or potential receptors such as surface water bodies or marshes. In such scenarios, assessment and monitoring become even more intricate, requiring considerations for neighboring properties, as well as addressing regulatory and logistical complexities associated with marshes or surface water bodies. This paper delves into the intricacies of these challenges, providing examples and solutions drawn from multiple sites assessed and monitored by the authors. Through a technical exploration of these issues, the paper aims to contribute valuable insights to the field of coastal CCR groundwater management.

 
May 15th, 1:30 PM May 15th, 2:00 PM

NAVIGATING THE COMPLEXITIES OF CCR GROUNDWATER ASSESSMENT & MONITORING IN COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS-​ A TECHNICAL EXPLORATION.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Navigating the Complexities of Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) Groundwater Assessment and Monitoring in Coastal Environments: A Technical Exploration Authors Mr. Stephen Wilson - United States - Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting Mr. Trenton Godwin - United States - Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting Mr. Kevin Stephenson - United States - Resolute Environmental & Water Resources Consulting Abstract Coastal environments pose distinctive challenges for the monitoring and assessment of Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) groundwater. Unlike their inland counterparts, coastal sites present complexities such as naturally-occurring brackish or saline groundwater containing elevated concentrations of Appendix III and IV constituents. These constituents, complicating both background assessments and compliance evaluations, are exacerbated by the existence of salt marshes and other brackish surface water bodies. These surface water features can act as alternative sources of Appendix III and IV constituents to groundwater. Additionally, the presence of tidally-influenced groundwater and surface water introduces dynamic factors, rapidly altering potentiometric surfaces, groundwater flow directions, and overall groundwater quality. The geographic location of coastal CCR sites, their limited accessibility, and comparatively smaller size further complicate groundwater assessment and monitoring. In contrast to often expansive inland coal-fired power plant sites spanning thousands of acres, coastal CCR sites typically occupy tens of acres or less. This spatial constraint poses challenges for delineating impacted groundwater before reaching property boundaries, on-site obstacles, or potential receptors such as surface water bodies or marshes. In such scenarios, assessment and monitoring become even more intricate, requiring considerations for neighboring properties, as well as addressing regulatory and logistical complexities associated with marshes or surface water bodies. This paper delves into the intricacies of these challenges, providing examples and solutions drawn from multiple sites assessed and monitored by the authors. Through a technical exploration of these issues, the paper aims to contribute valuable insights to the field of coastal CCR groundwater management.