In Situ Remediation of Multi-Metal Groundwater Plumes (Arsenic, Cobalt, Lithium, and Molybdenum)- ​ Treatability Studies.pdf

Dimitri Vlassopoulos, Anchor QEA
Masa Kanematsu, Anchor QEA
Jason Stuckey, Anchor QEA
Grace Weatherford, Anchor QEA

Description

In Situ Remediation of Multi-Metal Groundwater Plumes (Arsenic, Cobalt, Lithium, and Molybdenum): Treatability Studies Authors Dr. Dimitri Vlassopoulos - United States - Anchor QEA Dr. Masa Kanematsu - United States - Anchor QEA Dr. Jason Stuckey - United States - Anchor QEA Ms. Grace Weatherford - United States - Anchor QEA Ms. Minna Carey - United States - Anchor QEA Abstract In situ injection for groundwater remediation at CCP sites could save millions of dollars compared to conventional technologies. Anchor QEA performed successful treatability studies with a wide range of reagents on groundwater samples from multiple sites with multiple constituents of interest (COIs) including arsenic, cobalt, lithium, and/or molybdenum. Studies included aquifer soil and groundwater sampling and geochemical characterization, batch tests to screen and optimize reagents, column tests to assess treatment effectiveness and reversibility, and selective sequential extractions to document sequestration mechanisms and stability. Column tests were conducted to evaluate the COI removal performance of reagent-treated aquifer soils under flow conditions and to confirm treatments do not release other constituents from the aquifer/soil matrix. At the end of the column tests, treatment stability was determined by pumping background site groundwater through the columns. Several reagent solutions were successful in removing COIs below standards, depending upon the site-specific COI mix and groundwater geochemistry. The most robust solutions for removing COI mixes precipitated (hydr)oxides of iron and/or manganese, as well as layered double hydroxides. Some treatments, however, require a two-stage injection. Depending on the target COIs, treatment could also be achieved by single-stage injections, which are easier to implement at some sites.

 
May 15th, 11:30 AM May 15th, 12:00 PM

In Situ Remediation of Multi-Metal Groundwater Plumes (Arsenic, Cobalt, Lithium, and Molybdenum)- ​ Treatability Studies.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

In Situ Remediation of Multi-Metal Groundwater Plumes (Arsenic, Cobalt, Lithium, and Molybdenum): Treatability Studies Authors Dr. Dimitri Vlassopoulos - United States - Anchor QEA Dr. Masa Kanematsu - United States - Anchor QEA Dr. Jason Stuckey - United States - Anchor QEA Ms. Grace Weatherford - United States - Anchor QEA Ms. Minna Carey - United States - Anchor QEA Abstract In situ injection for groundwater remediation at CCP sites could save millions of dollars compared to conventional technologies. Anchor QEA performed successful treatability studies with a wide range of reagents on groundwater samples from multiple sites with multiple constituents of interest (COIs) including arsenic, cobalt, lithium, and/or molybdenum. Studies included aquifer soil and groundwater sampling and geochemical characterization, batch tests to screen and optimize reagents, column tests to assess treatment effectiveness and reversibility, and selective sequential extractions to document sequestration mechanisms and stability. Column tests were conducted to evaluate the COI removal performance of reagent-treated aquifer soils under flow conditions and to confirm treatments do not release other constituents from the aquifer/soil matrix. At the end of the column tests, treatment stability was determined by pumping background site groundwater through the columns. Several reagent solutions were successful in removing COIs below standards, depending upon the site-specific COI mix and groundwater geochemistry. The most robust solutions for removing COI mixes precipitated (hydr)oxides of iron and/or manganese, as well as layered double hydroxides. Some treatments, however, require a two-stage injection. Depending on the target COIs, treatment could also be achieved by single-stage injections, which are easier to implement at some sites.