Hydrogeologic Considerations for Measuring Background Concentrations of CCP Constituents in Groundwater.pdf

Jeffrey Frazier, WSP USA Inc
Nathan Pavlick, WSP USA Inc

Description

Hydrogeologic Considerations for Measuring Background Concentrations of CCR Constituents in Groundwater Authors Mr. Jeffrey Frazier - United Kingdom - WSP USA Inc Mr. Nathan Pavlick - United States - WSP USA Inc Abstract Current and historical coal-fired power plants are often situated along the margin of major water bodies to support the plants’ water requirements. Accordingly, coal combustion product (CCP) management units are often situated along the margin of a major river or reservoir, representing a hydrogeologic zone of groundwater discharge for both shallow and relatively deep groundwater sources. A flow-net-based conceptual model for groundwater flow and discharge in this discharge zone is reviewed in consideration of background as a three-dimensional concept based on a three-dimensional groundwater flow system. For example, a vertical component of groundwater flow may influence or fully represent background geochemistry, and a background well may be placed in many locations relative to the CCP management unit. Regional groundwater discharge zones are zones of hydrogeologic convergence, which may promote the mixing of shallow and deep aqueous geochemistries and result in natural chemical reactions observed as geochemical anomalies potentially unrelated to a release of CCP constituents. Additionally, a holistic review is provided for potential cultural, topographic, and geologic attributes that illuminate and/or influence background geochemistry and hydrogeologic flow pathways. Recommended review components include historical land use and place names, topography, springs, water supply wells, mineral resources and mines, waste disposal sites, bedrock geology, and structural geology. This holistic review is promoted as required due diligence when considering the presence, distribution, and measured concentrations of CCP constituents in background groundwater quality. Finally, a detailed, more robust understanding and measurement of background groundwater quality is promoted as a quantitative, relatively definitive approach to demonstrating a source of a CCP constituent in groundwater that is unrelated to a release from a CCP management unit.

 
May 15th, 2:30 PM May 15th, 3:00 PM

Hydrogeologic Considerations for Measuring Background Concentrations of CCP Constituents in Groundwater.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Hydrogeologic Considerations for Measuring Background Concentrations of CCR Constituents in Groundwater Authors Mr. Jeffrey Frazier - United Kingdom - WSP USA Inc Mr. Nathan Pavlick - United States - WSP USA Inc Abstract Current and historical coal-fired power plants are often situated along the margin of major water bodies to support the plants’ water requirements. Accordingly, coal combustion product (CCP) management units are often situated along the margin of a major river or reservoir, representing a hydrogeologic zone of groundwater discharge for both shallow and relatively deep groundwater sources. A flow-net-based conceptual model for groundwater flow and discharge in this discharge zone is reviewed in consideration of background as a three-dimensional concept based on a three-dimensional groundwater flow system. For example, a vertical component of groundwater flow may influence or fully represent background geochemistry, and a background well may be placed in many locations relative to the CCP management unit. Regional groundwater discharge zones are zones of hydrogeologic convergence, which may promote the mixing of shallow and deep aqueous geochemistries and result in natural chemical reactions observed as geochemical anomalies potentially unrelated to a release of CCP constituents. Additionally, a holistic review is provided for potential cultural, topographic, and geologic attributes that illuminate and/or influence background geochemistry and hydrogeologic flow pathways. Recommended review components include historical land use and place names, topography, springs, water supply wells, mineral resources and mines, waste disposal sites, bedrock geology, and structural geology. This holistic review is promoted as required due diligence when considering the presence, distribution, and measured concentrations of CCP constituents in background groundwater quality. Finally, a detailed, more robust understanding and measurement of background groundwater quality is promoted as a quantitative, relatively definitive approach to demonstrating a source of a CCP constituent in groundwater that is unrelated to a release from a CCP management unit.