Data Collection, Assimilation and Reporting Methods to Support Pond Closure – A Case Study.pdf

Katherine Warwick (Coco), Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
Joseph Keller, Haley & Aldrich Inc.
Kirkland Broadwell, Haley & Aldrich Inc.

Description

Data Collection, Assimilation and Reporting Methods to Support Pond Closure – A Case Study Authors Ms. Katherine (Kat) Warwick (Coco) - United States - Haley & Aldrich, Inc. Mr. Joseph Keller - United States - Haley & Aldrich Inc. Dr. Kirkland Broadwell - United States - Haley & Aldrich Inc. Abstract An automated “go/no-go” reporting system was developed for use by project stakeholders (Owner, Owner’s Engineer, Contractor, and contractor’s engineer) in support of a large ash pond closure in the mid-Atlantic. This reporting system not only documents compliance with the Construction Contractor’s Monitoring Plan (CCMP) and project specifications, but also to informs the contractor where it is safe to work across three open excavation areas summing approximately 45 acres. The primary goals of the automated reporting system were to keep the contractor working safely and within the project specifications; and to provide flexibility to work in various areas across the three open excavations. To account for changing conditions horizontally and vertically within the pond, Factor of Safety (FoS) charts that establish pore pressure alarm thresholds were developed for planned excavation areas identified by the Contractor to evaluate maximum allowable incremental lift heights. The approach described above is designed to maintain flexibility and steady progress in field operations by 1) identifying area(s) where work can begin or continue (i.e., yellow or red alarms not triggered and project specifications met); and 2) where practical, implementing modifications to means and methods following the process described in the CCMP, which would be based on real-time data collection and field observations as needed, to satisfy the specified thresholds, project specifications, and allow work to continue. This presentation will discuss how the reporting provided flexibility on where they can work safely across the work area.

 
May 15th, 8:30 AM May 15th, 9:00 AM

Data Collection, Assimilation and Reporting Methods to Support Pond Closure – A Case Study.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Data Collection, Assimilation and Reporting Methods to Support Pond Closure – A Case Study Authors Ms. Katherine (Kat) Warwick (Coco) - United States - Haley & Aldrich, Inc. Mr. Joseph Keller - United States - Haley & Aldrich Inc. Dr. Kirkland Broadwell - United States - Haley & Aldrich Inc. Abstract An automated “go/no-go” reporting system was developed for use by project stakeholders (Owner, Owner’s Engineer, Contractor, and contractor’s engineer) in support of a large ash pond closure in the mid-Atlantic. This reporting system not only documents compliance with the Construction Contractor’s Monitoring Plan (CCMP) and project specifications, but also to informs the contractor where it is safe to work across three open excavation areas summing approximately 45 acres. The primary goals of the automated reporting system were to keep the contractor working safely and within the project specifications; and to provide flexibility to work in various areas across the three open excavations. To account for changing conditions horizontally and vertically within the pond, Factor of Safety (FoS) charts that establish pore pressure alarm thresholds were developed for planned excavation areas identified by the Contractor to evaluate maximum allowable incremental lift heights. The approach described above is designed to maintain flexibility and steady progress in field operations by 1) identifying area(s) where work can begin or continue (i.e., yellow or red alarms not triggered and project specifications met); and 2) where practical, implementing modifications to means and methods following the process described in the CCMP, which would be based on real-time data collection and field observations as needed, to satisfy the specified thresholds, project specifications, and allow work to continue. This presentation will discuss how the reporting provided flexibility on where they can work safely across the work area.