CCR Closure- Best Practices in Project Management Through the Construction Life Cycle.pdf

Glen Toepfer, CQA Solutions

Description

CCR Closure: Best Practices in Project Management that Provide Asset Protection Throughout Each Stage of the Construction Life Cycle by Reducing Liabilities, Ensuring Quality and Expediting Regulatory Acceptance. Authors Mr. Glen Toepfer - United States - CQA Solutions Abstract CCR closure can be performed by clean closure through CCR removal and disposal or by closure in place methods. Regardless of the closure method being used, the construction process will have defined stages. The construction cycle begins at conception and seemingly culminates in the completion of either the fieldwork or the operational stage. However, the owner’s liability remains for up to 30-years post closure. When Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) became governed by Subtitle D regulations, there was a scramble by owners to find the best construction methods and products that would ensure compliance with the new regulations. Because many construction materials and methods used in the solid waste industry have been proven to meet Subtitle D regulations, many CCR owners turned to firms working in the solid waste containment industry for their expertise. What makes these projects very complex is that they typically involve a combination of multiple vendors working together during various project stages to ensure that through each stage of construction the design is properly implemented and regulatory approval is ultimately granted. Lessons learned from nearly ten-years of CCR containment system construction and thirty-plus years in other waste containment industries show that project management is key to asset protection throughout the construction life cycle. Most liabilities recognized during operations or post-closure could have been mitigated during earlier construction stages had the project manager known how to identify them and been able to hold the vendors accountable. This paper will present an overview of the life cycle of CCR construction projects from conception through regulatory approval. The discussion of each component will identify key construction drivers, risks, mitigation methods, and commonly observed pitfalls in the risk mitigation. This discussion will provide valuable tools for project managers working on CCR disposal and/or closure projects.

 
May 15th, 10:30 AM May 15th, 11:00 AM

CCR Closure- Best Practices in Project Management Through the Construction Life Cycle.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

CCR Closure: Best Practices in Project Management that Provide Asset Protection Throughout Each Stage of the Construction Life Cycle by Reducing Liabilities, Ensuring Quality and Expediting Regulatory Acceptance. Authors Mr. Glen Toepfer - United States - CQA Solutions Abstract CCR closure can be performed by clean closure through CCR removal and disposal or by closure in place methods. Regardless of the closure method being used, the construction process will have defined stages. The construction cycle begins at conception and seemingly culminates in the completion of either the fieldwork or the operational stage. However, the owner’s liability remains for up to 30-years post closure. When Coal Combustion Residuals (CCR) became governed by Subtitle D regulations, there was a scramble by owners to find the best construction methods and products that would ensure compliance with the new regulations. Because many construction materials and methods used in the solid waste industry have been proven to meet Subtitle D regulations, many CCR owners turned to firms working in the solid waste containment industry for their expertise. What makes these projects very complex is that they typically involve a combination of multiple vendors working together during various project stages to ensure that through each stage of construction the design is properly implemented and regulatory approval is ultimately granted. Lessons learned from nearly ten-years of CCR containment system construction and thirty-plus years in other waste containment industries show that project management is key to asset protection throughout the construction life cycle. Most liabilities recognized during operations or post-closure could have been mitigated during earlier construction stages had the project manager known how to identify them and been able to hold the vendors accountable. This paper will present an overview of the life cycle of CCR construction projects from conception through regulatory approval. The discussion of each component will identify key construction drivers, risks, mitigation methods, and commonly observed pitfalls in the risk mitigation. This discussion will provide valuable tools for project managers working on CCR disposal and/or closure projects.