Attenuation of Metals and Inorganics- Insights from Laboratory Testing Approaches.pdf

Larissa Smith, SiREM
Michael Healey, SiREM
Jeff Roberts, SiREM
Allison Kreinberg, Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.

Description

Natural Attenuation of Metals and Inorganics: Insights from Laboratory Testing Approaches Authors Ms. Larissa Smith - Canada - SiREM Mr. Michael Healey - Canada - SiREM Mr. Jeff Roberts - Canada - SiREM Ms. Allison Kreinberg - United States - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Ms. Crystal Wilson - United States - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Mr. Lane Dorman - United States - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Mr. Andrzej Przepiora - Canada - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Abstract Laboratory treatability studies can be used to evaluate and optimize groundwater treatment options for contaminants found at coal combustion residual (CCR) sites. An important consideration in groundwater treatment selection is the suitability of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a treatment component or as a stand-alone passive treatment. This presentation will focus on the use of treatability testing to evaluate enhanced and natural attenuation treatment options for redox sensitive metals in CCR-impacted groundwater. In one demonstration, a comprehensive laboratory program was performed based upon the USEPA’s tiered approach to identify the natural attenuation processes, rates, attenuation capacities, and longevity of arsenic (As),lithium (Li), sulfate (SO42-), and boron (B) impacted groundwater from CCR impoundment sites. At the Site, the testing was used to develop site-specific sorption coefficients, demonstrate that after sorption, potential desorption back into groundwater would not be affected by redox conditions, and provide insight into the attenuation mechanisms. These findings helped to support MNA as part of the corrective action plan submitted to the regulator. In a second demonstration, zero valent iron (ZVI) was used to reduce and sorb As from groundwater. The results from the treatability study were used to support the feasibility assessment for the Site.

 
May 15th, 11:00 AM May 15th, 11:30 AM

Attenuation of Metals and Inorganics- Insights from Laboratory Testing Approaches.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Natural Attenuation of Metals and Inorganics: Insights from Laboratory Testing Approaches Authors Ms. Larissa Smith - Canada - SiREM Mr. Michael Healey - Canada - SiREM Mr. Jeff Roberts - Canada - SiREM Ms. Allison Kreinberg - United States - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Ms. Crystal Wilson - United States - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Mr. Lane Dorman - United States - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Mr. Andrzej Przepiora - Canada - Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. Abstract Laboratory treatability studies can be used to evaluate and optimize groundwater treatment options for contaminants found at coal combustion residual (CCR) sites. An important consideration in groundwater treatment selection is the suitability of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a treatment component or as a stand-alone passive treatment. This presentation will focus on the use of treatability testing to evaluate enhanced and natural attenuation treatment options for redox sensitive metals in CCR-impacted groundwater. In one demonstration, a comprehensive laboratory program was performed based upon the USEPA’s tiered approach to identify the natural attenuation processes, rates, attenuation capacities, and longevity of arsenic (As),lithium (Li), sulfate (SO42-), and boron (B) impacted groundwater from CCR impoundment sites. At the Site, the testing was used to develop site-specific sorption coefficients, demonstrate that after sorption, potential desorption back into groundwater would not be affected by redox conditions, and provide insight into the attenuation mechanisms. These findings helped to support MNA as part of the corrective action plan submitted to the regulator. In a second demonstration, zero valent iron (ZVI) was used to reduce and sorb As from groundwater. The results from the treatability study were used to support the feasibility assessment for the Site.