Using Machine Learning to Predict the Performance of Coal Ash in Concrete with the Bulk Oxide Content.pdf

Behzad Tahmouresi, Oklahoma State University
Tyler Ley, Oklahoma State University

Description

Exploring Non-Traditional Coal Ash as a Sustainable Alternative in Concrete: Performance Analysis and Predictive Modeling Authors Mr. Behzad Tahmouresi - United States - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 Dr. Tyler Ley - United States - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 Abstract Since 2009, there has been a decrease in the production of traditional fly ash in concrete, which has jeopardized its availability as a supplementary cementing material (SCM). Non-traditional coal ash (NTCA) from ponds, surface impoundments, and landfills is being investigated as a potential substitute to address this issue. NTCA include blended or bottom ash as well as fly ash that has been landfilled or stored. As the availability of traditional fly ash declines, the concrete industry is increasingly exploring non-traditional sources such as ponded and ground bottom ash. Coal ash is one of the biggest industrial wastes produced in the US that reusing it has advantages for the environment, such as fewer greenhouse gas emissions and landfill usage, as well as financial benefits, such as cheaper disposal expenses and more sales revenue. NTCA sources were used in concrete mixtures for this study. At 20% and 40% replacement levels, the compressive strength and surface resistivity of the NTCA concrete were assessed at various hydration durations, ranging from 3 days to 180 days. The NTCA cement paste's hydration heat evolution was further investigated using isothermal calorimetry. To create a model for forecasting the compressive strength, surface resistivity, and hydration heat of NTCA concrete, automated scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques were applied to the chemical investigation of several NTCAs.

 
May 14th, 2:00 PM May 14th, 2:30 PM

Using Machine Learning to Predict the Performance of Coal Ash in Concrete with the Bulk Oxide Content.pdf

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Exploring Non-Traditional Coal Ash as a Sustainable Alternative in Concrete: Performance Analysis and Predictive Modeling Authors Mr. Behzad Tahmouresi - United States - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 Dr. Tyler Ley - United States - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 Abstract Since 2009, there has been a decrease in the production of traditional fly ash in concrete, which has jeopardized its availability as a supplementary cementing material (SCM). Non-traditional coal ash (NTCA) from ponds, surface impoundments, and landfills is being investigated as a potential substitute to address this issue. NTCA include blended or bottom ash as well as fly ash that has been landfilled or stored. As the availability of traditional fly ash declines, the concrete industry is increasingly exploring non-traditional sources such as ponded and ground bottom ash. Coal ash is one of the biggest industrial wastes produced in the US that reusing it has advantages for the environment, such as fewer greenhouse gas emissions and landfill usage, as well as financial benefits, such as cheaper disposal expenses and more sales revenue. NTCA sources were used in concrete mixtures for this study. At 20% and 40% replacement levels, the compressive strength and surface resistivity of the NTCA concrete were assessed at various hydration durations, ranging from 3 days to 180 days. The NTCA cement paste's hydration heat evolution was further investigated using isothermal calorimetry. To create a model for forecasting the compressive strength, surface resistivity, and hydration heat of NTCA concrete, automated scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques were applied to the chemical investigation of several NTCAs.