Relationship of Energy and the Effect on Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) Behavior

Tyler Hitt, TTL, Inc.
Harvey Upchurch, TTL, Inc.
Will Rex, TTL, Inc.

Description

Relationship of Energy and the Effect on Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) Behavior: A Study of Moisture-Density Relationships Authors Mr. Tyler Hitt - United States - TTL, Inc. Mr. Harvey Upchurch - United States - TTL, Inc. Mr. Will Rex - United States - TTL, Inc. Abstract The determination of maximum dry density and optimum moisture content using a standard compactive energy for soils is defined in ASTM D698. Coal combustion residuals (CCR) are commonly utilized for beneficial re-use material such as replacement of structural fill, incorporation into structural concrete mixes or placed into permanent closure in an approved facility. Utilizing CCR as a structural material often requires quality control using moisture-density relationships. The study performed provides an overview of how CCR reacts when energy levels are modified from those used in ASTM D698. The number of drops from a standard rammer and the number of lifts was modified above and below the minimum 12,400 ft-lbf/ft^3 effort to observe how it affects the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content. The composite of CCR (restricted to fly ash) was primarily composed of materials less than 4.75 millimeters to 75 micrometers in particle size. The purpose is to study how the compactive effort affects the moisture-density relationship and to predict how the materials react to varying compactive effort. This information will be useful in quality control operations for field operations to determine when the test results indicate materials being tested are not represented by the selected standard proctor.

 
May 14th, 3:30 PM May 14th, 5:00 PM

Relationship of Energy and the Effect on Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) Behavior

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Relationship of Energy and the Effect on Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) Behavior: A Study of Moisture-Density Relationships Authors Mr. Tyler Hitt - United States - TTL, Inc. Mr. Harvey Upchurch - United States - TTL, Inc. Mr. Will Rex - United States - TTL, Inc. Abstract The determination of maximum dry density and optimum moisture content using a standard compactive energy for soils is defined in ASTM D698. Coal combustion residuals (CCR) are commonly utilized for beneficial re-use material such as replacement of structural fill, incorporation into structural concrete mixes or placed into permanent closure in an approved facility. Utilizing CCR as a structural material often requires quality control using moisture-density relationships. The study performed provides an overview of how CCR reacts when energy levels are modified from those used in ASTM D698. The number of drops from a standard rammer and the number of lifts was modified above and below the minimum 12,400 ft-lbf/ft^3 effort to observe how it affects the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content. The composite of CCR (restricted to fly ash) was primarily composed of materials less than 4.75 millimeters to 75 micrometers in particle size. The purpose is to study how the compactive effort affects the moisture-density relationship and to predict how the materials react to varying compactive effort. This information will be useful in quality control operations for field operations to determine when the test results indicate materials being tested are not represented by the selected standard proctor.