AGRICULTURAL GYPSUM FOR IMPROVED PRODUCTION AND SOIL CARBON CAPTURE

Brian Gardener, Ag Spectrum Company
Roland Wilhelm, Purdue University Department of Agronomy

Description

Agricultural Gypsum for Improved Production and Soil Carbon Capture Authors Dr. Brian Gardener - United States - Ag Spectrum Company Dr. Roland Wilhelm - United States - Purdue University Department of Agronomy Abstract When applied as spreadable powder, gypsum can improve agricultural soil quality and fertility in multiple ways. At low rates, it supplies essential calcium and sulfate to crop plants. At high rates, it can remediate soils plagued by sodicity or aluminum toxicity. However, gypsum has its greatest value to the large majority of farmers at intermediate rates of 500 to 2000 lbs. per acre per year. At such rates, multiple facets of soil health can be improved. While the reliability and magnitude of gypsum-induced yield enhancements depend on multiple facets of climate, soil chemistry, crop management, millions of tons of gypsum could be applied profitably on Midwest farms every year. Unfortunately, such applications have become increasingly costly as supplies of gypsum from coal plants decrease. However, recent studies demonstrating the ability of agricultural gypsum to stabilize soil carbon and increase carbon sequestration may help redirect more gypsum by-products to agricultural lands. The utility of agricultural gypsum as a tool for improving farm operations while potentially offsetting carbon emissions and supporting carbon markets will be discussed.

 
May 14th, 3:30 PM May 14th, 5:00 PM

AGRICULTURAL GYPSUM FOR IMPROVED PRODUCTION AND SOIL CARBON CAPTURE

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Agricultural Gypsum for Improved Production and Soil Carbon Capture Authors Dr. Brian Gardener - United States - Ag Spectrum Company Dr. Roland Wilhelm - United States - Purdue University Department of Agronomy Abstract When applied as spreadable powder, gypsum can improve agricultural soil quality and fertility in multiple ways. At low rates, it supplies essential calcium and sulfate to crop plants. At high rates, it can remediate soils plagued by sodicity or aluminum toxicity. However, gypsum has its greatest value to the large majority of farmers at intermediate rates of 500 to 2000 lbs. per acre per year. At such rates, multiple facets of soil health can be improved. While the reliability and magnitude of gypsum-induced yield enhancements depend on multiple facets of climate, soil chemistry, crop management, millions of tons of gypsum could be applied profitably on Midwest farms every year. Unfortunately, such applications have become increasingly costly as supplies of gypsum from coal plants decrease. However, recent studies demonstrating the ability of agricultural gypsum to stabilize soil carbon and increase carbon sequestration may help redirect more gypsum by-products to agricultural lands. The utility of agricultural gypsum as a tool for improving farm operations while potentially offsetting carbon emissions and supporting carbon markets will be discussed.