How sampling methods a ect the interpretation of groundwater microbial communities

Ann Ojeda, Auburn University
Natalia Malina, Auburn University
Elyssa Rivera, Auburn University
Shifat Monami, Auburn University

Description

How sampling methods affect the interpretation of groundwater microbial communities Authors Dr. Ann Ojeda - United States - Auburn University Dr. Natalia Malina - United States - Auburn University Ms. Elyssa Rivera - United States - Auburn University Ms. Shifat Monami - United States - Auburn University Dr. Laura Bilenker - United States - Auburn University Dr. Ming-Kuo Lee - United States - Auburn University Abstract The basis of bioremediation in a groundwater setting is to activate biogeochemical processes that impact the behavior of compounds or elements of interest. For example, biogeochemical processes can stimulate element sequestration in a solid phase or, in the case of organic contaminants, transform the compound to a less toxic byproducts. The effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, therefore, is linked to understanding the microbial communities in the subsurface and to the relative distribution of key players that are capable of desirable biogeochemical outcomes. However, there are few studies that investigate the ways in which sampling methods designed to assess native microbial communities affect interpretation of bioremediation potential. Here, a diffusive microbial sampler was designed and deployed in groundwater wells impacted by coal combustion product leachate. The sampler allowed for long-term cultivation of the microbial communities in duplicate. Metagenomic analysis was used as the basis to 1) understand how elements of interest affect microbial diversity, 2) investigate the reproducibility of cultivation in situ, and 3) compare the microbial community structure between samples preserved in anoxic groundwater versus those exposed to oxygen during sample collection. The results point to best practices to assess bioremediation potential in groundwater settings.

 
May 14th, 3:30 PM May 14th, 5:00 PM

How sampling methods a ect the interpretation of groundwater microbial communities

Grand Rapids, Michigan

How sampling methods affect the interpretation of groundwater microbial communities Authors Dr. Ann Ojeda - United States - Auburn University Dr. Natalia Malina - United States - Auburn University Ms. Elyssa Rivera - United States - Auburn University Ms. Shifat Monami - United States - Auburn University Dr. Laura Bilenker - United States - Auburn University Dr. Ming-Kuo Lee - United States - Auburn University Abstract The basis of bioremediation in a groundwater setting is to activate biogeochemical processes that impact the behavior of compounds or elements of interest. For example, biogeochemical processes can stimulate element sequestration in a solid phase or, in the case of organic contaminants, transform the compound to a less toxic byproducts. The effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, therefore, is linked to understanding the microbial communities in the subsurface and to the relative distribution of key players that are capable of desirable biogeochemical outcomes. However, there are few studies that investigate the ways in which sampling methods designed to assess native microbial communities affect interpretation of bioremediation potential. Here, a diffusive microbial sampler was designed and deployed in groundwater wells impacted by coal combustion product leachate. The sampler allowed for long-term cultivation of the microbial communities in duplicate. Metagenomic analysis was used as the basis to 1) understand how elements of interest affect microbial diversity, 2) investigate the reproducibility of cultivation in situ, and 3) compare the microbial community structure between samples preserved in anoxic groundwater versus those exposed to oxygen during sample collection. The results point to best practices to assess bioremediation potential in groundwater settings.