A Comparative Evaluation of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) Analysis on Fly Ash

Christopher Frishcosy, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Ashley Manning-Berg, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Linen Cooper, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Robert Hageman, Tennessee Valley Authority

Description

An Evaluation of On-Site X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis on Coal Combustion Residuals Authors Mr. Christopher Frishcosy - United States - University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Dr. Ashley Manning-Berg - United States - University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Ms. Linen Cooper - United States - University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Mr. Robert Hageman - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Mr. Timothy Moyers - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Ms. Tara Masterson - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Mr. Nicholas McClung - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Abstract As coal-fired fossil plants are retiring and less Coal Combustion Residuals (CCRs) are being produced, CCR Unit owners across the nation are focused on harvesting landfilled and ponded coal ash to maintain the supply for beneficial use markets. To aid in the development of proficient harvesting strategies, researchers at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga College of Engineering and Computer Science and the College of Biology, Geology, and Environmental Science (UTC – CECS & BGE) have partnered with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to evaluate handheld X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) quantitative analysis as an effective tool for characterizing CCRs on-site. The goals of this study are to develop a testing methodology for on-site XRF analysis of CCR and validated calibrations which account for variations in field conditions. This research will be performed through UTC’s emerging Geomaterials Testing and Research Laboratory (GTRL). UTC’s paper for World of Coal Ash (WOCA) 2024 will describe the findings of this investigation and suggest sample preparation methods and testing protocols aimed at helping CCR Unit owners evaluate their assets in a timely, cost effective, and accurate manner.

 
May 14th, 2:30 PM May 14th, 3:00 PM

A Comparative Evaluation of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) Analysis on Fly Ash

Grand Rapids, Michigan

An Evaluation of On-Site X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis on Coal Combustion Residuals Authors Mr. Christopher Frishcosy - United States - University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Dr. Ashley Manning-Berg - United States - University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Ms. Linen Cooper - United States - University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Mr. Robert Hageman - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Mr. Timothy Moyers - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Ms. Tara Masterson - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Mr. Nicholas McClung - United States - Tennessee Valley Authority Abstract As coal-fired fossil plants are retiring and less Coal Combustion Residuals (CCRs) are being produced, CCR Unit owners across the nation are focused on harvesting landfilled and ponded coal ash to maintain the supply for beneficial use markets. To aid in the development of proficient harvesting strategies, researchers at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga College of Engineering and Computer Science and the College of Biology, Geology, and Environmental Science (UTC – CECS & BGE) have partnered with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to evaluate handheld X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) quantitative analysis as an effective tool for characterizing CCRs on-site. The goals of this study are to develop a testing methodology for on-site XRF analysis of CCR and validated calibrations which account for variations in field conditions. This research will be performed through UTC’s emerging Geomaterials Testing and Research Laboratory (GTRL). UTC’s paper for World of Coal Ash (WOCA) 2024 will describe the findings of this investigation and suggest sample preparation methods and testing protocols aimed at helping CCR Unit owners evaluate their assets in a timely, cost effective, and accurate manner.