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Description

Walter Clyde Curry, a well-known student of Milton, analyzes the origins and unique construction of the grand stage upon which Milton presents the drama of human destiny in Paradise Lost. Through close examination of four entities—Heaven of Heavens, Hell, chaos, and the World—a greatly expanded view is provided of the poet’s concept of space and God’s relation to total creation. In facing structural and philosophical problems Milton is shown to be neither a materialist, nor an eclectic, nor a pantheist, as many scholars have insisted; he emerges rather as a master syncretist of widely divergent materials and as a devout theopantist. Curry has established a firm basis for a better understanding of the poet’s methodology and for a clearer insight into his artistic accomplishments

Walter Clyde Curry retired from the headship of the English department of Vanderbilt University in 1955, after having served the university for forty years. His books include Chaucer and the Mediaeval Sciences and Shakespeare's Philosophical Patterns.

Publication Date

1957

Publisher

The University Press of Kentucky

Place of Publication

Lexington, KY

ISBN

9780813151878

eISBN

9780813162591

Keywords

John Milton, Paradise Lost

Disciplines

Literature in English, British Isles

Milton's Ontology, Cosmogony, and Physics
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