Liquor in the Land of the Lost Cause: Southern White Evangelicals and the Prohibition Movement

Title

Liquor in the Land of the Lost Cause: Southern White Evangelicals and the Prohibition Movement

Authors

Joe L. Coker

Files

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Description

The temperance movement first appeared in America in the 1820s as an outgrowth of the same evangelical fervor that fostered a wide range of reform campaigns. Like many of these movements, temperance was confined primarily to the northeastern United States during the antebellum period. Viewed with suspicion by Southerners because of its close connection to the antislavery movement, prohibition sentiment remained relatively weak in the antebellum South. After the Civil War, however, southern evangelicals embraced the movement, and by 1915, liquor had been officially banned from the region. This book examines how southern evangelical men and women transformed a Yankee moral reform movement into an ideology that was compatible with southern culture and values.

Publication Date

2007

Publisher

The University Press of Kentucky

Place of Publication

Lexington, KY

ISBN

978-0-8131-2471-1

eISBN

978-0-8131-7280-4 (pdf version)

eISBN

978-0-8131-3698-1 (epub version)

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813124711.001.0001

Keywords

Temperance movement, United States, Antebellum period, South, Antislavery movement, Civil War, Liquor, Moral reform, Ideology

Disciplines

History | United States History