Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8080-760X

Year of Publication

2017

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Document Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

Education

Department

Kinesiology and Health Promotion

First Advisor

Dr. Melody Noland

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the worksite wellness weight loss program called Weight Loss Matters (WLM) for employees at the University of Kentucky. The three main objectives were to measure the effect of Weight Loss Matters for employees from June 2006 to December 2011 in the following areas (1) prescription claims for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, (2) weight loss, and (3) food diary compliance. Participants included 591 employees who participated in WLM for at least one session from 2006 to 2011 for whom there were data. This study employed a Quasi-experiment, longitudinal design. Data were collected from WLM records and UK health plan records. Data obtained from WLM included attendance, physical activity reported, food diary compliance, participation goal, height, and weight. Measures from the health plan database were prescription claims for hypertension, diabetes, and cholesterol at twelve months prior to start date, six months post-start date, and 12 months post-start date for each participant. Data analysis included Chi Square, Fishers Exact, ANOVA, ANCOVA, linear and logistic regression. After completing two sessions of WLM, a significant number of participants ceased taking hypertension medications at six and 12 months post-WLM. There was significant weight loss for all participants after one class. For continued attendance (multiple sessions,) participants continued to have small weight losses. Analysis showed a significant relationship between weight loss and food diary completion, with the more food diaries completed, the more weight was lost. Food diary compliance and attendance were significant predictors of weight loss. Information gained from this study will be helpful in designing future weight loss programs at the University of Kentucky and may be useful for similar worksite wellness weight loss programs.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2017.214

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