Theme 1: Rangeland/Grassland Ecology--Oral Sessions

Description

For the last twenty years, it has been known that grasses are capable of extracting toxins from the soil. More recently, it has been shown that microorganisms from ruminants, especially sheep, can biodegrade certain toxins in plants and soil, including munition residues. The combination of these two processes act as an agricultural means to clear toxins and munitions from land has been termed Phyto-Ruminal-Bioremediation by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as illustrated in the discussion below. As an example, plants containing toxins such as pyrrolizidine alkaloids can be cleared from pastures using sheep and their ruminant microorganisms. Use of grasslands and certain grasses is also being used to clean up other toxins such as munitions in areas where residues of explosives have been left following wars, especially in the middle east. This includes Kuwait’s Desert Storm, as well as, Egypt’s battles in World War II. It has been documented that when a bomb explodes or a cannon fires, 15% of the munitions is non-oxidized and lies as a toxic residue on the soil. This is true even after many years pass by, ie. nearly 80 years. The use of the Phyto-Ruminal-Bioremediation technology has the ability to revitalize “war-torn” areas into sustainable pastures for animal production and food production for human populations.

The presentation will establish the scientific basis for this new agricultural based technology, Phyto-Ruminal-Bioremediation. This scientific approach to clean-up pollutants is a new paradigm for bioremediation. Grasses and ruminates have the potential to make this world a better place.

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Grasses and Ruminants That Will Help Save Space Ship Earth

For the last twenty years, it has been known that grasses are capable of extracting toxins from the soil. More recently, it has been shown that microorganisms from ruminants, especially sheep, can biodegrade certain toxins in plants and soil, including munition residues. The combination of these two processes act as an agricultural means to clear toxins and munitions from land has been termed Phyto-Ruminal-Bioremediation by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as illustrated in the discussion below. As an example, plants containing toxins such as pyrrolizidine alkaloids can be cleared from pastures using sheep and their ruminant microorganisms. Use of grasslands and certain grasses is also being used to clean up other toxins such as munitions in areas where residues of explosives have been left following wars, especially in the middle east. This includes Kuwait’s Desert Storm, as well as, Egypt’s battles in World War II. It has been documented that when a bomb explodes or a cannon fires, 15% of the munitions is non-oxidized and lies as a toxic residue on the soil. This is true even after many years pass by, ie. nearly 80 years. The use of the Phyto-Ruminal-Bioremediation technology has the ability to revitalize “war-torn” areas into sustainable pastures for animal production and food production for human populations.

The presentation will establish the scientific basis for this new agricultural based technology, Phyto-Ruminal-Bioremediation. This scientific approach to clean-up pollutants is a new paradigm for bioremediation. Grasses and ruminates have the potential to make this world a better place.