Theme 1

Description

Grasslands and native rangelands are the predominant land-use all over the world. Tall fescue [Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort] is a cool-season perennial grass widely grown throughout the temperate regions of the world and an important component of the grasslands. Drought can have serious consequences on performance of agriculture, soil and plant health, and economics. Developing drought tolerant plants that can maintain productivity during drought, will have great environmental and economic benefits to farmers. A tall fescue population was developed by crossing a drought tolerant genotype to a susceptible genotype. The population was evaluated for different morphological and yield traits under irrigated and rain-fed conditions at the University of Wyoming, USA. Large variations among the 252 tall fescue genotypes for several traits of interest have been observed. Plants under irrigated conditions were about 1.5 times more vigorous and 1.9 times taller than those grown in rain-fed conditions. Rain-fed conditions greatly reduced the tillering ability (< 2.6 fold) of tall fescue plants. Plants under irrigated conditions were 2.9 times more productive than those grown in rain-fed condition. The largest difference in a year for water content (WC) between the plants grown in the two conditions was 8.06%. Genotypes with better tolerance to drought have been identified in the population which could be useful to develop drought tolerant tall fescue cultivars.

Share

COinS
 

Agronomic Traits in Tall Fescue Populations under Irrigated and Rain-Fed Conditions

Grasslands and native rangelands are the predominant land-use all over the world. Tall fescue [Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort] is a cool-season perennial grass widely grown throughout the temperate regions of the world and an important component of the grasslands. Drought can have serious consequences on performance of agriculture, soil and plant health, and economics. Developing drought tolerant plants that can maintain productivity during drought, will have great environmental and economic benefits to farmers. A tall fescue population was developed by crossing a drought tolerant genotype to a susceptible genotype. The population was evaluated for different morphological and yield traits under irrigated and rain-fed conditions at the University of Wyoming, USA. Large variations among the 252 tall fescue genotypes for several traits of interest have been observed. Plants under irrigated conditions were about 1.5 times more vigorous and 1.9 times taller than those grown in rain-fed conditions. Rain-fed conditions greatly reduced the tillering ability (< 2.6 fold) of tall fescue plants. Plants under irrigated conditions were 2.9 times more productive than those grown in rain-fed condition. The largest difference in a year for water content (WC) between the plants grown in the two conditions was 8.06%. Genotypes with better tolerance to drought have been identified in the population which could be useful to develop drought tolerant tall fescue cultivars.