Track 1-05

Description

Leucaena leucocephala cv. Tarramba was first introduced to Indonesia in 2001 as an activity of ACIAR Project AS2/2000/157. It has now become the most popular variety used by agencies promoting the use of leucaena for ruminant feeding in Eastern Indonesia (Nulik et al. 2004). The greater adaptability and higher production of Tarramba, even in the dry season, its erect growth habit as well as its tolerance of the psyllid insect (Heteropsylla cubana) compared to the ubiquitous ‘common’ leucaena, has been frequently observed (Nulik et al. 2004).

The cultivar has attracted much interest from farmers and other stakeholders who request seed for its wider development as high quality forage for feeding cattle. This increasing demand highlights the need to understand the best practices for establishment and management, and the need for local supply of good quality seed. Lack of seed availability is one of the most important barriers to the wider distribution and use of Tarramba. It is estimated that at least 1000 kg and perhaps as much as 5000 kg of Tarramba may be needed annually to ensure adequate seed supply.

Share

COinS
 

Farmer Based Seed Production of Leucaena leucocephala in Eastern Indonesia

Leucaena leucocephala cv. Tarramba was first introduced to Indonesia in 2001 as an activity of ACIAR Project AS2/2000/157. It has now become the most popular variety used by agencies promoting the use of leucaena for ruminant feeding in Eastern Indonesia (Nulik et al. 2004). The greater adaptability and higher production of Tarramba, even in the dry season, its erect growth habit as well as its tolerance of the psyllid insect (Heteropsylla cubana) compared to the ubiquitous ‘common’ leucaena, has been frequently observed (Nulik et al. 2004).

The cultivar has attracted much interest from farmers and other stakeholders who request seed for its wider development as high quality forage for feeding cattle. This increasing demand highlights the need to understand the best practices for establishment and management, and the need for local supply of good quality seed. Lack of seed availability is one of the most important barriers to the wider distribution and use of Tarramba. It is estimated that at least 1000 kg and perhaps as much as 5000 kg of Tarramba may be needed annually to ensure adequate seed supply.