Start Date

21-1-2017 11:00 AM

Description

In a recent paper, Kathryn Watts and Jerry Chatterton (2004) gave an excellent overview of the basic factors affecting carbohydrate levels in forages and how these factors affect forage management.

  • Sugars are the substrates for all plant growth, thus, they are critical to plant growth and development.
  • Sugars are produced by photosynthesis during daylight.
  • At night plants use energy from sugars formed by photosynthesis to grow.
  • Whenever the rates of photosynthesis exceed plant growth rates, carbohydrates accumulate.
  • At times, plant stresses decrease growth rates more than photosynthesis and carbohydrates accumulate.
  • Factors that contribute to plant stress include water and nutrient deficiencies, saline or acidic soils, as well as cold or hot temperatures.
  • High concentrations of carbohydrates (sugars, starch, and fructan) can be found in pasture or dry hay of cool-season grasses.

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Jan 21st, 11:00 AM

How to Maximize Energy Content in Forage Grasses

In a recent paper, Kathryn Watts and Jerry Chatterton (2004) gave an excellent overview of the basic factors affecting carbohydrate levels in forages and how these factors affect forage management.

  • Sugars are the substrates for all plant growth, thus, they are critical to plant growth and development.
  • Sugars are produced by photosynthesis during daylight.
  • At night plants use energy from sugars formed by photosynthesis to grow.
  • Whenever the rates of photosynthesis exceed plant growth rates, carbohydrates accumulate.
  • At times, plant stresses decrease growth rates more than photosynthesis and carbohydrates accumulate.
  • Factors that contribute to plant stress include water and nutrient deficiencies, saline or acidic soils, as well as cold or hot temperatures.
  • High concentrations of carbohydrates (sugars, starch, and fructan) can be found in pasture or dry hay of cool-season grasses.