Start Date

7-1-2005 9:00 AM

Description

Forage quality means different things to different people. Forage quality varies tremendously among and within forage crops. Forage quality needs varies among and within animal species. Forage quality has been defined in terms of protein, fiber, lignin content, relative feed value, relative forage quality, color, smell, leafiness, fineness of stems, total digestible nutrients, and other physical and/or chemical components. All of these components have merit, but all fall short of clearly defining forage quality. Factors such as average daily gains, conception rates, milk production, wool production, etc. are reliable indicators of forage quality. Forage quality can be defined as: the extent to which a forage (pasture, hay, silage) has the ability to produce a desired animal response. With this working definition we realize that we must consider the animal. As an example, a high producing dairy cow needs a higher quality feed than a dry pregnant beef cow. A basic principle in efficient livestock production is to know forage quality and match that quality to animals needs.

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COinS
 
Jan 7th, 9:00 AM

Forage Quality--Back to Basics

Forage quality means different things to different people. Forage quality varies tremendously among and within forage crops. Forage quality needs varies among and within animal species. Forage quality has been defined in terms of protein, fiber, lignin content, relative feed value, relative forage quality, color, smell, leafiness, fineness of stems, total digestible nutrients, and other physical and/or chemical components. All of these components have merit, but all fall short of clearly defining forage quality. Factors such as average daily gains, conception rates, milk production, wool production, etc. are reliable indicators of forage quality. Forage quality can be defined as: the extent to which a forage (pasture, hay, silage) has the ability to produce a desired animal response. With this working definition we realize that we must consider the animal. As an example, a high producing dairy cow needs a higher quality feed than a dry pregnant beef cow. A basic principle in efficient livestock production is to know forage quality and match that quality to animals needs.