Year of Publication

2018

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Document Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

Engineering

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

First Advisor

Dr. Aaron M. Cramer

Abstract

In this dissertation, several volt-var optimization methods have been proposed to improve the expected performance of the distribution system using distributed renewable energy sources and conventional volt-var control equipment: photovoltaic inverter reactive power control for chance-constrained distribution system performance optimisation, integrated distribution system optimization using a chance-constrained formulation, integrated control of distribution system equipment and distributed generation inverters, and coordination of PV inverters and voltage regulators considering generation correlation and voltage quality constraints for loss minimization. Distributed generation sources (DGs) have important benefits, including the use of renewable resources, increased customer participation, and decreased losses. However, as the penetration level of DGs increases, the technical challenges of integrating these resources into the power system increase as well. One such challenge is the rapid variation of voltages along distribution feeders in response to DG output fluctuations, and the traditional volt-var control equipment and inverter-based DG can be used to address this challenge.

These methods aim to achieve an optimal expected performance with respect to the figure of merit of interest to the distribution system operator while maintaining appropriate system voltage magnitudes and considering the uncertainty of DG power injections. The first method is used to optimize only the reactive power output of DGs to improve system performance (e.g., operating profit) and compensate for variations in active power injection while maintaining appropriate system voltage magnitudes and considering the uncertainty of DG power injections over the interval of interest. The second method proposes an integrated volt-var control based on a control action ahead of time to find the optimal voltage regulation tap settings and inverter reactive control parameters to improve the expected system performance (e.g., operating profit) while keeping the voltages across the system within specified ranges and considering the uncertainty of DG power injections over the interval of interest. In the third method, an integrated control strategy is formulated for the coordinated control of both distribution system equipment and inverter-based DG. This control strategy combines the use of inverter reactive power capability with the operation of voltage regulators to improve the expected value of the desired figure of merit (e.g., system losses) while maintaining appropriate system voltage magnitudes. The fourth method proposes a coordinated control strategy of voltage and reactive power control equipment to improve the expected system performance (e.g., system losses and voltage profiles) while considering the spatial correlation among the DGs and keeping voltage magnitudes within permissible limits, by formulating chance constraints on the voltage magnitude and considering the uncertainty of PV power injections over the interval of interest.

The proposed methods require infrequent communication with the distribution system operator and base their decisions on short-term forecasts (i.e., the first and second methods) and long-term forecasts (i.e., the third and fourth methods). The proposed methods achieve the best set of control actions for all voltage and reactive power control equipment to improve the expected value of the figure of merit proposed in this dissertation without violating any of the operating constraints. The proposed methods are validated using the IEEE 123-node radial distribution test feeder.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2018.132

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