Year of Publication

2016

College

Public Health

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Committee Chair

David Mannino, MD

Committee Member

Erin Abner, PhD, MPH

Committee Member

Lorie Chesnut, DrPH, MPH

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study is to predict the odds of death in participants with bronchiectasis and to determine if ever smokers have increased odds of death when compared to never smokers.

Methods: Data for the study was used from the Bronchiectasis Research. Pearson chi square test is used to compare never smokers to ever smokers for age, gender, and participants enrolled status. Logistic regression is used to predict the odds of death for smoking status, age, gender, or CT scan findings. CT scan findings for this study are dilated airways, airways that are thickening, tree-in-bud infiltrates or mucoid impaction.

Result: The study determined that 60% of the bronchiectasis participants in the study are between 60 and 79 years of age, 79% of the populations are females, and 60% have never smoked. Ninety percent of the populations are currently enrolled as active, 5% have been lost to follow up and 5% are deceased. The multivariate logistic regression model for predicting the odds of death resulted in an odds ratio of 2.67 for males, 1.06 for age and 1.75 for ever smokers.

Conclusions: There is a statistically significant difference in the data sets when comparing never smokers to ever smokers for gender, age, and participant status. Gender, age, and smoking status are predictors of the odds for death. Males are 2.67 times more likely to die than females. Smokers are 1.75 times more likely to die than non-smokers. CT scan findings are not predictors of the odds for death.

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