Year of Publication

2019

College

Public Health

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Committee Chair

Dr. Terry Bunn

Committee Member

Dr. Steven Browning

Committee Member

Dr. Susan Spengler

Committee Member

Dr. Timothy Prince

Abstract

Objectives

Traumatic work-related injuries result in thousands of deaths per year in the United States. It is important to determine factors that may contribute to these deaths in order to find ways to decrease the risk of injury. The study objectives were to determine if alcohol and drug (prescription and illicit) use could increase the risk of severe injuries or cause a specific mechanism of injury (being struck by or against an object, a fall, or injured as an occupant in a motor vehicle) when consumed prior to an injury.

Methods

A retrospective, facility-based, case review study of traumatic work-related injuries was conducted using the Kentucky Trauma Registry data set from 2013 to 2017. Subjects who were tested for drugs and alcohol were selected as participants in the study. Descriptive analysis, odds ratios, and logistic regression were performed on these cases.

Results

A person was 55% less likely with alcohol use and 20% more likely with drug use to have a moderate/severe work injury when the substances were consumed prior to the injury. The effect of drug and alcohol use prior to a work-related injury on the mechanism of the injury differed by type of mechanism. However, all of these results were not statistically significant.

Conclusion

Further research with a retrospective case-control study should be done. It might replicate the findings of this study and show results that are statistically significant.

Objectives

Traumatic work-related injuries result in thousands of deaths per year in the United States. It is important to determine factors that may contribute to these deaths in order to find ways to decrease the risk of injury. The study objectives were to determine if alcohol and drug (prescription and illicit) use could increase the risk of severe injuries or cause a specific mechanism of injury (being struck by or against an object, a fall, or injured as an occupant in a motor vehicle) when consumed prior to an injury.

Methods

A retrospective, facility-based, case review study of traumatic work-related injuries was conducted using the Kentucky Trauma Registry data set from 2013 to 2017. Subjects who were tested for drugs and alcohol were selected as participants in the study. Descriptive analysis, odds ratios, and logistic regression were performed on these cases.

Results

A person was 55% less likely with alcohol use and 20% more likely with drug use to have a moderate/severe work injury when the substances were consumed prior to the injury. The effect of drug and alcohol use prior to a work-related injury on the mechanism of the injury differed by type of mechanism. However, all of these results were not statistically significant.

Conclusion

Further research with a retrospective case-control study should be done. It might replicate the findings of this study and show results that are statistically significant.

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