Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8025-3547

Year of Publication

2022

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Document Type

Doctoral Dissertation

College

Communication and Information

Department/School/Program

Communication

First Advisor

Dr. Donald W. Helme

Abstract

Study 1 explored the dominant or deciding barriers and facilitators, beyond environmental and systemic factors, influencing women’s LARC uptake (RQ1, RQ2). Moreover, it examined pregnancy ambivalence and motivation to prevent unintended pregnancy as distal variables to LARC information seeking and uptake (H1, H3). Additionally, it examined embodied experience as an important source of information about contraception (H4). Furthermore, it explored how informal and formal sources support reproductive health decision-making, specifically focusing on social networks as sources of information, knowledge (RQ3, H2), and norms regarding LARC uptake (RQ4, RQ4a, RQ5). Study 2 examined the influence of social learning and LARC knowledge in the evaluation of campaign messages (RQ6) and tested whether such evaluations influence the generation (RQ7) and diffusion (H5) of campaign influence. Finally, it examined how exposure to negative or positive online LARC talk influences intentions to seek information (H6) and adopt LARC (H7).

In study 1, findings suggest that increasing the pervasiveness of LARC information, experiential or not, may facilitate women’s familiarity and comfort with this method. Moreover, familiarity and comfort with LARC methods may help translate knowledge to interest, and potentially subsequent use. Additionally, the findings from study 2 concur with previous studies consistent with DOI, in that increased exposure to a campaign can prompt participants to initiate discussions about LARC with friends, which then serve as the potential initial step toward adopting a LARC. In sum, this dissertation contributes to the theoretical and practical understanding of women’s perceptions and use of new media, mass media, and interpersonal communication channels in relation to contraceptive decision-making.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.13023/etd.2022.74

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