Presenter Information

Bill Talley, Summit Seeds, Inc.

Start Date

24-2-2005 9:30 AM

Description

Seed coating for alfalfa has been available since the mid to late 70’s. Over the last 30 years, advances in the industry have made it the choice of many producers. The purpose of the coatings at that time was mainly to add weight to increase the ballistic properties and to be a carrier for the rhizobia. Through research and new technology, coatings have evolved and shown great agronomic benefits. Seed coating can provide an opportunity to supply effective quantities of needed materials to each seed, which can influence both the physical property, and the microenvironment of the seed. Coatings can protect the rhizobia and provide a microenvironment for quick nodulation, insuring good seed-soil contact. This improves the movement of water to the seed, and increases the seed weight and size, which improves seed plantability. Treating the seed with a precise loading of pesticides and /or fungicides, supplying of growth regulators, incorporating hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic materials in the coating regulates water imbibition and germination, and adds beneficial elements and micronutrients to the seed. Indeed the future of seed coating may develop into a prescription approach – coating the seeds with the necessary elements to fit the needs of the field and the crop for optimum growth.

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Feb 24th, 9:30 AM

Advances in Alfalfa Seed Coating

Seed coating for alfalfa has been available since the mid to late 70’s. Over the last 30 years, advances in the industry have made it the choice of many producers. The purpose of the coatings at that time was mainly to add weight to increase the ballistic properties and to be a carrier for the rhizobia. Through research and new technology, coatings have evolved and shown great agronomic benefits. Seed coating can provide an opportunity to supply effective quantities of needed materials to each seed, which can influence both the physical property, and the microenvironment of the seed. Coatings can protect the rhizobia and provide a microenvironment for quick nodulation, insuring good seed-soil contact. This improves the movement of water to the seed, and increases the seed weight and size, which improves seed plantability. Treating the seed with a precise loading of pesticides and /or fungicides, supplying of growth regulators, incorporating hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic materials in the coating regulates water imbibition and germination, and adds beneficial elements and micronutrients to the seed. Indeed the future of seed coating may develop into a prescription approach – coating the seeds with the necessary elements to fit the needs of the field and the crop for optimum growth.