Start Date

24-2-1994 9:00 AM

Description

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is historically the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef and sheep diets. Over 300,000 acres of alfalfa are grown annually in Kentucky, with state yields averaging between 3 and 4 tons per acre.

The development and testing of alfalfa varieties is a dynamic process that impacts all Kentucky farmers. The Kentucky Alfalfa Variety Testing program was re-started in 1990 and is carried out through the efforts of several people, including Leonard Lauriault, Linda Brown (Western Kentucky University), Garry Lacefield, Paul Vincelli, and John Parr. Alfalfa varieties are being studied for yield in 6 plot studies over 3 locations (Lexington, Bowling Green, and Princeton). Other research being conducted include the effect of aphanomyces root rot on variety yield and persistence and the effect of variety on forage quality.

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Feb 24th, 9:00 AM

Advances in Alfalfa Variety Development and Testing

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is historically the highest yielding, highest quality forage legume grown in Kentucky. It forms the basis of Kentucky's cash hay enterprise and is an important component in dairy, horse, beef and sheep diets. Over 300,000 acres of alfalfa are grown annually in Kentucky, with state yields averaging between 3 and 4 tons per acre.

The development and testing of alfalfa varieties is a dynamic process that impacts all Kentucky farmers. The Kentucky Alfalfa Variety Testing program was re-started in 1990 and is carried out through the efforts of several people, including Leonard Lauriault, Linda Brown (Western Kentucky University), Garry Lacefield, Paul Vincelli, and John Parr. Alfalfa varieties are being studied for yield in 6 plot studies over 3 locations (Lexington, Bowling Green, and Princeton). Other research being conducted include the effect of aphanomyces root rot on variety yield and persistence and the effect of variety on forage quality.