Year of Publication

2009

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Document Type

Dissertation

College

Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Peter R. Giancola

Abstract

This investigation examined several dimensions of personality functioning in a longitudinal sample of females. These data are part of an existing project evaluating female development across 3 different time points starting in adolescence and transitioning into adulthood. Subjects were categorized into a clinical group (females with a high degree of psychiatric comorbidity) and a normal control group. All participants were initially recruited when they were between 14-18 years of age, and were followed up twice when they were 19-23, and 24-28. In an attempt to explore possible heterogeneity in personality trait development, the research is presented as three separate studies examining the following: (1) fluctuations in mean-level and rank order stability estimates across time; (2) the validity of established personality trends relative to their association with antisocial behavior; and (3) mechanisms that may contribute to personality trait consistency across development such as neighborhood context. This is the first study to investigate personality functioning across time in females who are disturbed in multiple areas of social and psychological functioning. Results highlight the importance of considering distinct subgroups of the general population when exploring developmental trends in personality.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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